W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-grddl-wg@w3.org > February 2007

RE: Use Cases review

From: Clark, John <CLARKJ2@ccf.org>
Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2007 09:57:41 -0500
Message-ID: <F122C25B4CD6F34BB119A97593679601027CA80D@CCHSCLEXMB59.cc.ad.cchs.net>
To: public-grddl-wg@w3.org

Dan Connolly wrote:
> > Clark, John:
> > > 1. Introduction[1]:
> > >   
> > >   * "There are many dialects in practice among the many XML 
> > > documents on the
> > >     web."
> > >     ->
> > >     "There exist many dialects of XML in use by documents 
> on the web."
> > >   
> > Done.
> 
> Hmm... that seems overly stilted, to me.
> 
> Note that this sentence also starts the main spec. I don't 
> intend to change it.

I was simply trying to clarify the original, which seemed a bit
confusing.  Perhaps "There are many dialects of XML in use by documents
on the web." would be easier to read.

> > >   * "How, for example, does software discover the author 
> of a poem, a
> > >     spreadsheet and an ontology? And how can software 
> determine whether
> > >     authors of each are in fact the same person?"
> > >     ->
> > >     "How, for example, does software discover the author 
> of a poem, a
> > >     spreadsheet, or an ontology? And how can software 
> determine whether
> > >     any two of these authors are in fact the same person?"
> > >   
> > Done.
> 
> That seems odd too; how can two authors be the same person?
> Two names might refer to the same people, but if the authors 
> are the same, there's just one of them, not two.

Perhaps the second question should be rephrased as "And how can software
determine whether any two of these authors in fact refer to the same
person?"  Again, I was trying to clarify the original, here.

> > >   * Is the RDF abstraction a "syntax"?  I always thought 
> of it as a 
> > > "model".
> > >     *shrugs*
> > >   
> > I prefer model too. So changed to model.
> 
> Hmm... I'd avoid "model".

You're clearly correct, here.  Obviously, I need more model theory in my
life.  Thanks for keeping a sharp eye on these edits.

Perhaps the lesson here is that it can be difficult for people to
understand the idea of an abstract syntax.  I don't know what can be
done about that, but perhaps we can link to the relevant section of the
RDF Concepts Rec, changing the text to:

   "RDF includes an XML concrete syntax and
[http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-concepts/#section-Graph-syntax an abstract
syntax]."

Or perhaps it would be better to use a bibliographic reference, although
the document uses one for the Concepts Rec in the previous paragraph.

Take care,

    John L. Clark





Cleveland Clinic is ranked one of the top 3 hospitals in
America by U.S.News & World Report. Visit us online at
http://www.clevelandclinic.org for a complete listing of
our services, staff and locations.


Confidentiality Note:  This message is intended for use
only by the individual or entity to which it is addressed
and may contain information that is privileged,
confidential, and exempt from disclosure under applicable
law.  If the reader of this message is not the intended
recipient or the employee or agent responsible for
delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are
hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or
copying of this communication is strictly prohibited.  If
you have received this communication in error,  please
contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in
its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.  Thank you.


===================================
Received on Monday, 12 February 2007 14:58:06 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 8 January 2008 14:11:47 GMT