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Re: Use Cases review

From: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>
Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2007 07:14:42 -0600
To: Fabien Gandon <Fabien.Gandon@sophia.inria.fr>
Cc: "Clark, John" <CLARKJ2@ccf.org>, public-grddl-wg@w3.org
Message-Id: <1171286083.7497.821.camel@dirk>

On Sun, 2007-02-11 at 14:35 +0100, Fabien Gandon wrote:
> John,
> 
> Thanks a lot for your detailed review and its extremely clear breakdown.
> Your comments have been integrated in version v 1.69 2007/02/11 13:27:22
> http://www.w3.org/2001/sw/grddl-wg/doc43/scenario-gallery.htm
> 
> Details of this integration are given below.
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Fabien
> 
> 
> Clark, John:
> > 1. Introduction[1]:
> >   
> >   * "There are many dialects in practice among the many XML documents on
> > the
> >     web."
> >     ->
> >     "There exist many dialects of XML in use by documents on the web."
> >   
> Done.

Hmm... that seems overly stilted, to me.

Note that this sentence also starts the main spec. I don't intend
to change it.


> >   * "How, for example, does software discover the author of a poem, a
> >     spreadsheet and an ontology? And how can software determine whether
> >     authors of each are in fact the same person?"
> >     ->
> >     "How, for example, does software discover the author of a poem, a
> >     spreadsheet, or an ontology? And how can software determine whether
> >     any two of these authors are in fact the same person?"
> >   
> Done.

That seems odd too; how can two authors be the same person?
Two names might refer to the same people, but if the
authors are the same, there's just one of them, not two.


> >   * Is the RDF abstraction a "syntax"?  I always thought of it as a
> > "model".
> >     *shrugs*
> >   
> I prefer model too. So changed to model.

Hmm... I'd avoid "model".

RDF's graph abstraction is definitely an abstract syntax.
Resource Description Framework (RDF): Concepts and Abstract Syntax
W3C Recommendation 10 February 2004
http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-concepts/

Note also...

[[
Model Theory (n.) A formal semantic theory which relates expressions to
interpretations.

(The name 'model theory' arises from the usage, traditional in logical
semantics, in which a satisfying interpretation is called a "model".
This usage is often found confusing, however, as it is almost exactly
the inverse of the meaning implied by terms like "computational
modelling", so has been avoided in this document.)
]]
 -- http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-mt/#glossModeltheory

-- 
Dan Connolly, W3C http://www.w3.org/People/Connolly/
D3C2 887B 0F92 6005 C541  0875 0F91 96DE 6E52 C29E
Received on Monday, 12 February 2007 13:14:53 GMT

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