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Re: English-Gujarati Translation-Queries

From: Martin J. Duerst <duerst@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 08:18:40 +0900
Message-Id: <4.2.0.58.J.20001213080346.02d1bef0@sh.w3.mag.keio.ac.jp>
To: Roomy Naqvy <roomynaqvy@123india.com>, w3c-translators@w3.org
Hello Roomy,

At 00/12/12 08:36 -0800, Roomy Naqvy wrote:
>Dear Martin
>
>Thanks for your response. I went to http:/www.w3.org/TR and then went to 
>http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml [XML 1.0], http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/ 
>[HTML 4.01 Specification], http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/ [XHTML 1.0: The 
>Extensible Hypertext Markup Language] and to 
>http://www.w3.org/TR/WAI-WEBCONTENT/ [Web Content Accessibility Guidelines].
>
>I understand all these would count as specifications and could  be translated.

Correct. If there is anything else on http://www.w3.org which you would
want to translate, you would have to ask for permission (rather than,
as for specifications, to just notify us).


>Now, the first query, Gujarati does not have the Latin-Western character 
>set. So how does one get through the problem? I could certainly 
>edit/translate the documents in Frontpage or other HTML editors using my 
>Gujarati font [Vakil.ttf] which is phonetic in nature. However, the users 
>would have to download the font to be able to view the document. The font 
>can always be put up on the site to be downloaded. Is this how one could 
>go about it? Or are there other methods of overcoming the problem?

You indeed need an encoding. There is an Indian standard on encodings
for the various Indic scripts, and you can use this one. An alternative
is to use an Unicode-based encoding, i.e. UTF-16 or UTF-8.
The problem in this case is that the browser has to do some work.
We should check which browsers support which languages. Internet
Explorer shows Gujarati in various places, so that may be a good
sign. We can move the discussion for this to a more appropriate
list if we need to.
The advantage of using a standard encoding is that it is well-definde,
so that it may easily be converted to something else if needed.
Are there any other Gujarati web pages around? How does your font
look? As a TrueType font, what kind of supporting tables for
rendering does it come with?


>The second thing is that I do not own a server nor do I own a domain name. 
>I do have a small website on geocities but I don't think that's a good 
>idea. I would be against hosting the translated specification on the 
>geocities page. So, how does one go about it?

Well, one solution would be to host it on geocities temporarily. Another
would be to ask somebody else in India or elsewhere to host it.


Regards,   Martin.
Received on Tuesday, 12 December 2000 18:43:10 UTC

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