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minutes: UAWG F2F June 4

From: Jim Allan <allanj@tsbvi.edu>
Date: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 17:30:22 -0500
Message-ID: <CA+=z1Wm2bTb69hJK155opr8BbZODiyLCjOJ0CCtmnTH7QiL8sQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: WAI-ua <w3c-wai-ua@w3.org>
from http://www.w3.org/2012/06/04-ua-minutes.html

W3C
- DRAFT -
User Agent Accessibility Guidelines Working Group Teleconference
04 Jun 2012

See also: IRC log
Attendees

Present
    Jim, Kelly, Greg, Kim, Jeanne, Jan, Mark
Regrets
Chair
    kellyford, jimallan
Scribe
    jallan

Contents

    Topics
        Intent Intent 1.7.4
        guideline one questions
        review action-728
        186
        i.7.4 examples
        217 revise IER
        examples 1.7.4
        241 ier revise
        2.5.6 navigation
        2.7.6
        2.4.1 again
        I.8.Y ier above
        2.7.6 change preference settings outside UAUI
        Action-641 IER for 2.7.7
    Summary of Action Items

<trackbot> Date: 04 June 2012

<kford> We are starting in just a second.

<kford> Jeanne ahnding out W3C swag items. Nowgiving him a sweater for hosting.

<kford> http://www.w3.org/WAI/UA/2012/ED-UAAG20-20120531/

<kford> Repalce date with 0604 as soon as we start making changes today.
Intent Intent 1.7.4

http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0093.html

<Jan> owr->own

<Jan> powerful stylesheet->stylesheet

Intent:

Stylesheets provide for powerful customization of rendered content.
>From time to time a user may need to make only slight modifications to
the stylesheets used on a web site to satisfy certain accessibility
needs. At other times a web author may have created a stylesheet that
a user with a disability finds helpful. The intent of this success
criteria is to allow users to easily save the...

scribe: CSS for a web site and make needed modifications without
having to create full stylesheet of their own and to apply well
designed stylesheets to other web pages where they find the
stylesheets helpful.

<mhakkinen> question: where it says save the CSS, is that implying
inline CSS also? Should it just be the extrernal style sheet?

<kford> I believe it is just the external.

<kford> That is external CSS.

<kford> This would only be external and not that inline or in the head.

Intent: Stylesheets provide for powerful customization of rendered
content. From time to time a user may need to make only slight
modifications to the author supplied external stylesheets used on a
web site to satisfy certain accessibility needs. At other times a web
author may have created a stylesheet that a user with a disability
finds helpful. The intent of this success criteria is to...
... allow users to easily save the CSS for a web site and make needed
modifications without having to create full stylesheet of their own
and to apply well designed stylesheets to other web pages where they
find the stylesheets helpful.

<scribe> scribe: jallan

Resolution: include the above as intent for 1.7.4

add External to wording of SC 1.7.4
guideline one questions

http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0097.html

<Jan> User choice of alternative content?

Resolution: change stem of 1.1.1 to User Choice of Alternative Content

discussion of cross reference between 1.1.3 and 1.3.1 about elements
with alternative content

gl: suggest delete 1.1.3. keep i.3.1 remove reference to 1.1.3 on (d)
and change definition of highlight

<greg> Change 3rd sentence of definition of highlight to "Graphical
highlight mechanisms include dotted boxes, changed colors or fonts,
underlining, adjacent icons, magnification, and reverse video."

<greg> Typo: add space after fist comma in 2nd sentence of definition
of highlight.

rrsagent: make minutes

all +1

resolution: delete 1.1.3. keep 1.3.1 remove reference to 1.1.3 on (d)
(see 1.1.3), Jeanne to review IER of 113 and move necessary parts to
1.3.1,

rrsagent: make minutes
review action-728

views that render text should follow keyboard text conventions for a
given control (input, plain text, tree view, custom control)

<Jan> 2.1.7 Follow Text Keyboard Conventions (former 2.1.5): The user
agent follows keyboard conventions for the operating environment.

<Jan> 2.1.7 Follow Keyboard Conventions (former 2.1.5): The user agent
follows keyboard conventions for the operating environment.

2.1.7 Follow Keyboard Conventions (former 2.1.5): The user agent
follows keyboard conventions of the operating environment.

resoluition: change 2.1.7 Follow Keyboard Conventions (former 2.1.5):
The user agent follows keyboard conventions for the operating
environment.

resolution: change 2.1.7 Follow Keyboard Conventions (former 2.1.5):
The user agent follows keyboard conventions for the operating
environment.
... Change 3rd sentence of definition of highlight to "Graphical
highlight mechanisms include dotted boxes, changed colors or fonts,
underlining, adjacent icons, magnification, and reverse video." Typo:
add space after first comma in 2nd sentence of definition of
highlight.

rrsagent: make minutes

rrsagent: make minutes

kp: 2.2.1 and 2.3.1 should be cross referenced

<greg> Kelly suggests that we an close 717 because it's not
necessarily to have sequential navigation between important elements,
and not sure what else it refers to.

discussion of direct and sequential navigation.

on this page x, y, z and important element, can tab through
sequentially through all elements, and to discover those elements that
are important

gl: 257 structured navigation. seems to overlap with our discussion.
limited to structural navigation.

kim will take over action-717 sequential navigation between important elements

jr: if jumping from header to header. are you moving sequentially or
directly between headers

kf: direct would be jump to the 3 heading

jr: if I say save, I mean save this document not some other document.
... 231

kf: see examples. this is related to mouseless browsing. then can jump
to specified objects

<Admin> The user can navigate directly to any important (structural
and operable) element in rendered content.

gl: reviews definition of navigation.

jr: what is the purpose of structural in admin statement above
... links are not structure, they are operable.

should be "The user can navigate directly to any important (e.g.
structural or operable) element in rendered content.

gl: structural elements would be table columns, headers, etc.
... is structural elements defined.

<Admin> The user can navigate directly to any important (e.g.
structural or operable) element in rendered content.

jr: direct navigation is very direct

kf: why do we have 233

sequential nav is 221.

jr: should 221 have next element in a class

js: we have an SC to define important elements.

jr: that is AAA

kp: missing is moving sequentially through important elements.

gl: is this a disservice. one of the things people want is structural
navigation. in H3 move but want to jump up to H2
... most commonly requested structural navigation are header and table
navigation

js: asking a company to add a feature for generic element navigation,
should be more specific (header and table) make it AA or A

<Admin> The user can move the keyboard focus backwards and forwards
through subsets of enabled elements in the current viewport including
headers and tables

gl: make generic important elements AAA and nav between headers and
table row/column AA or A

kp: table elements, row, column, header (TH)

jr: direct can be very arbitrary, 3rd H3 from bottom of document

<scribe> continued discussion of navigation (direct, sequential)

gl: if in a menu, items with underlines are direct navigation element

alt-f is direct navigation to menus. top and bottom, etc. there are
set points to jump to.

gl: jumping to different part of the heading tree (h3 to h1) is structural.

kp: users don't care what the navigation is called they just want to do it.

gl: that's why we have outline view or headings map. to add the
sequential/structural navigation (imposed) to something that did not
have an existing structure

<Admin> The user can move the keyboard focus among subsets of enabled
elements in the current viewport including headers and tables

<greg> The new SC on structural navigation could be something like:
The user can move the focus forward, backward, up and down a
structural hierarchy (e.g. between headers or within a table).

<Jan> The user agent provides at least one type of structural
navigation (e.g. by headers, table headers).?

<greg> The new SC on structural navigation could be something like:
The user can move the focus forward, backward, up and down a
structural hierarchy (including between headers or within a table).

kp: one or more...

gl: should specifically add headers and table navigation
... within table navigation

<greg> he new SC on structural navigation could be something like: The
user can move the focus forward, backward, up and down a structural
hierarchy (e.g. between headers or within tables).

<Jan> The user agent provides at least the following types of
structural navigation, where the structure types exist: (a) by header.
(b) table headers?

kp: this should be AA

discussion of A vs. AA

<jeanne> +1 to AA

agree that should be AA

<Jan> +1 to AA

+1 to AA

js: put it in 2.2

kp: put this in sequential

js agrees

kp: add to 2.2.5

<Jan> +1 to having it in 2.2

gl: what about 2.5

kp: ah ha. should be 2.5

proposed: new sc in 2.5 The user agent provides at least the following
types of structural navigation, where the structure types exist: (a)
by header. (b) table headers

ja: just table headers, or are we talking within table navigation,
like screen readers provide

The user agent provides at least the following types of structural
navigation, where the structure types exist: (a) by header. (b) with
tables

The user agent provides at least the following types of structural
navigation, where the structure types exist: (a) by header. (b) within
tables

resolved: The user agent provides at least the following types of
structural navigation, where the structure types exist: (a) by header.
(b) within tables

<kford> Proposal for 174 example:

<kford> Mikki browses to her favorite web site and finds the Arial 18
point type used for all headlines works well with her level of vision.
She then discovers a new web site and finds it difficult to read.
Returning to her favorite site a friend helps her discover that the
headlines are created with a CSS stylesheet. The two save this
stylesheet and study how it is created. Mikki is then able...

<kford> ...to quickly modify this stylesheet and use it on other web
sites, such as the new site she's discovered and adjusts the text to
her liking.

back from lunch
186

<Jan> Intent of Success Criterion 1.8.6:

<Jan> Some users want to be able to magnify content to make it more
legible. Some users want to be able to shrink content so that more of
the content is visible onscreen, which can help them understand the
structure of the content and their position in the content, even if
text has become too small to read.

http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0099.html

<Jan> Examples of Success Criterion 1.8.6:

<Jan> - A web application uses small text fonts, mixed with graphical
elements. The user tries increasing the text size alone, but the
graphical elements remain at their original sizes, causing the
application to be displayed improperly. Instead, the user zooms in on
the application, which makes the text more legible without breaking
other aspects of the presentation.

<Jan> - A viewport is used to display an image depicting an
organization chart. A user with a learning disability has difficulty
maintaining a mental representation of the organizational linkages for
items out of view. In order to facilitate their understanding of the
organization, the user zooms out to allow the entire chart to be
displayed.

gl: do we want to say anything about reflowing
... is there an implicit assumption that text reflowing
... just a question. should we say anything about reflow.

<Jan> http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0043.html

<Jan> http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0052.html

kp: +1 add user name

ja: +1

resolved: 186 ier
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0099.html
add to document
i.7.4 examples

<kford> 1.7.4 Example:

<kford> Mikki browses to her favorite web site and finds the Arial 18
point type used for all headlines works well with her level of vision.
She then discovers a new web site and finds it difficult to read.
Returning to her favorite site a friend helps her discover that the
headlines are created with a CSS stylesheet. The two save this
stylesheet and study how it is created. Mikki is then able...

<kford> ...to quickly modify this stylesheet and use it on other web
sites, such as the new site she's discovered and adjusts the text to
her liking.
217 revise IER

<greg> 2.1.7 Follow Keyboard Conventions (former 2.1.5): The user
agent follows keyboard conventions for the operating environment.

<greg> Intent:

<greg> Keyboard users rely on the user agent to provide keyboard
support that is both full-featured and consistent between
applications. When user agents follow platform conventions for
keyboard access it helps ensure that the functionality they rely on
are not accidentally omitted. In addition, making these inputs
consistent within and across programs greatly reduces learning curve,
cognitive...

<greg> ...load, and errors. User agents are encouraged to add keyboard
commands when such would provide additional features or benefit for
users, but should avoid omitting the standard commands, or assigning
them to different keys.

<greg> Examples:

<greg> Jack edits blog posts in his browser's text area control, and
can use the same keys for navigation and editing (e.g. arrow keys, as
well as commands to move to the beginning and end of the line or
content, cut, copy and paste) and formatting that he's used to using
in every other application on the platform.

<greg> Jack's user agent presents a custom tree control showing a
hierarchal outline view of the document headings. He can navigate
within that control using the same keys as work in the native tree
controls used in other applications (e.g. the up, down, left and right
arrow keys, as well as navigating directly to entries by typing the
beginning of their text).

<greg> Jack puts his browser into a caret browsing mode, in which he
can move the text cursor through the text on the page. The browser
supports the same keys for navigation and editing (e.g. arrow keys, as
well as commands to move to the beginning and end of the line or
content, and for copying) as are used in other applications.

<jeanne> Jack's user agent's custom tree control shows a hierarchal
outline view of the document headings. He can navigate within that
control using the same keys as work in the native tree controls used
in other applications (e.g. the up, down, left and right arrow keys,
as well as navigating directly to entries by typing the beginning of
their text).

resolved: include gregs ier above for 217

<kford> 1.7.4 Example:

<kford> Mikki browses to anew hweb site and discovers that the Arial
14 point type used for all headlines does not work well with her level
of vision. A friend helps Mikki discover that the headlines are
created with a CSS stylesheet. They save this stylesheet and study how
it is created. Mikki is then able to quickly modify this stylesheet
and adjust the headline text to alarger font and a...

<kford> ...different typeface.
examples 1.7.4

<kford> 1.7.4 Example:

<kford> Mikki browses to anew hweb site and discovers that the Arial
14 point type used for all headlines does not work well with her level
of vision. A friend helps Mikki discover that the headlines are
created with a CSS stylesheet. They save this stylesheet and study how
it is created. Mikki is then able to quickly modify this stylesheet
and adjust the headline text to alarger font and a...

<kford> ...different typeface.

Mikki browses to a new web site and discovers that the Arial 14 point
type used for all headlines does not work well with her level of
vision. A friend helps Mikki discover that the headlines are created
with a CSS stylesheet. They save this stylesheet and study how it is
created. Mikki can then quickly modify this stylesheet to adjust the
headline text to a larger font and a different...

scribe: typeface. She can use the modified stylesheet by applying it
as a user style sheet.

resolved: use 174 language above.

resolved: add the following as intent for 174

Intent: Stylesheets provide for powerful customization of rendered
content. From time to time a user may need to make only slight
modifications to the author supplied external stylesheets used on a
web site to satisfy certain accessibility needs. At other times a web
author may have created a stylesheet that a user with a disability
finds helpful. The intent of this success criteria is to...
... allow users to easily save the CSS for a web site and make needed
modifications without having to create full stylesheet of their own
and to apply well designed stylesheets to other web pages where they
find the stylesheets helpful.
241 ier revise

examples:

the user has alternative content revealed. when the user searches the
contents the alternative content is also searched.in a video user
agent, the user has captions turned on. The user can now use the
search function to seach through the captions and jump to the point in
the video where the search term is located in the time line.The user
is using a browser with native support for SVG. when...

scribe: searching the SVG is searched along with html content.

the user has alternative content revealed. when the user searches the
contents the alternative content is also searched.

b. in a video user agent, the user has captions turned on. The user
can now use the search function to seach through the captions and jump
to the point in the video where the search term is located in the time
line.

c. The user is using a browser with native support for SVG. when
searching the SVG is searched along with html content.

<kford> Close: Action 717

<kford> Close: Action 717

<kford> Close Action-717

<trackbot> ACTION-717 Resolve direct and sequential navigation to
important elements 2.3.1 and 2.2.1. closed

close action-664

<trackbot> ACTION-664 Look at intent for 2.4.1 on find and ensure it
clearly states goal to allow the user to find whatever the user agent
is displaying e.g. covers the case where you have chosen alternatives.
closed

<kford> Close Action-728

<trackbot> ACTION-728 Revise 2.1.7 Follow Text Keyboard Conventions to
acknowledge not all view showing text should follow text area
conventions. closed

jim will fix examples to include a11y angle, and the intent needs revised.

<Admin> 2.5.6 Navigate by Structural Element

<Admin> The user agent provides at least the following types of
structural navigation, where the structure types exist: (a) by header
(b) within tables.

<Admin> Intent of Success Criterion 2.5.6

<Admin> Users who find it difficult or impossible to use the mouse
require an efficient way to jump among elements without having to
navigate through intervening content. Navigating by heading is
especially important when scanning a webpage to find a pertinent
section. Navigating by table element is especially important when
building or reading tables.

<Admin> Examples of Success Criterion 2.5.5 :

<Admin> Jamie is blind. When he reads the New York Times he scans the
headlines to find interesting story. In order to do this needs a way
to go from headline to headline.

<Admin> Billie is a paraplegic who uses speech. She writes long legal
documents. When she is proofing a document she needs to scan each
section header. it takes far fewer speech commands to navigate the
section headers when she can jump directly to them. Billie also makes
extensive use of tables. It takes far fewer speech commands to
navigate tables when she can jump directly among elements. Direct...
2.5.6 navigation

<Admin> ...navigation to headlines and table elements allows her to do
her job without overusing her vocal cords and within required time
constraints.

<Admin> Celia she finds it difficult to have short-term memory issues
and is easily distracted. When looking for any particular section of
the document she finds it easier to scan through headings by jumping
from heading to heading rather than having to scan through an entire
page of potentially distracting text.

gl: need different example for within table navigation

<greg> No, need an example of hierarchical navigation, as opposed to
just sequential navigation among headings.

<jeanne> Celia has short-term memory issues and is easily distracted.
When looking for any particular section of the document she finds it
easier to scan through headings by jumping from heading to heading
rather than having to scan through an entire page of potentially
distracting text. Celia also finds it useful to be able to move from a
subheading to a major heading to orient herself within the context
without becoming confused.

resolved: examples of 256 above that were smithed live and edited in
the master document.
2.7.6

<jeanne> http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0045.html

edited live in the master document, live smithing

kf: ... adjust phrasing of SC. should it be ALL user agent preference settings

js: to meet these guidelines. then they can test against this document

kp: in the future there may be some new setting that we don't know
about that greatly affects accessibility. but that is a moving target.
fine with current wording

live edit in master document.

gl: add note: UA encouraged to go beyond...

<jeanne> Some users have a disability that prevents them from setting
up the user agent to their requirements when it is first installed or
used. They require the ability to set accessibility requirements
before entering the user agent. There are multiple ways this can be
accomplished including: detecting and implementing the platform
accessibility settings, providing an external file to modify, access
to settings from a separate utility program, or providing accessibilit

<jeanne> 2.7.6 Change preference settings outside the user interface:
The user can adjust any preference settings required to meet the User
Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) 2.0 from outside the user agent
user interface. (Level AA

Examples of Success Criterion 2.7.6 :

Sasha requires high contrast to be able to discriminate the shape of

letters. She has set the accessibility preferences on her mobile phone

to use the high contrast mode. When she launches her mobile browser for

the first time, it detects that she is using high contrast and presents

the opening page to her in high contrast mode.

Justin has low vision and an attention deficit disorder. He is setting

up his new e-book reader and is interrupted while setting the default

font colors. He accidentally sets his background and font color to

white on white and cannot read the settings screen to recover his

default settings. Justin exits the reader and follows the instructions

on the reader vendor web site to edit the "settings.ini" file to adjust

the colors outside the program, so he can use the reader the way he needs.

Aosa is blind and uses the accessibility settings on his mobile phone.

Because he has accidentally removed his settings in the past, he has now

set the hard button on his phone to restore his settings.

Bintu is deaf and enjoys watching captioned videos. Since different

video players may not have accessible settings, she sets her browser to

always display captions, and hopes that the video player does not

override the browser settings.

kf: first example, Sasha is good but not an example of this SC
... this SC is asking for a way for me to turn on caret browsing
before I open the browser

jr: agree with kelly, asking for the ability for the user to change
every setting related to UAAG seems like a big task

kf: responding to system settings is not a UA setting.

js: review other examples. if they are OK can remove the high contrast example.
2.4.1 again

Intent of Success Criterion 2.4.1 :

Local find in a user agent allows the user to easily locate desired
information in rendered content. The ability to search for alternative
text content allows screen reader users to find content they heard on
their speaker. Users with hearing impairment use find as an efficient
method of jumping to specific points in a video.

examples:

Marvin has a dexterity impairment. He needs to move efficiently to
specific text in the document. The user agent provides a local search
function that is available using speech commands. Marvin says "find,"
a text box with a search button appears. He spells the word he is
looking for, and says "enter", which executes the search function.

Betty, who is low vision, is attempting to create a user stylesheet
for site. She need to know the 'class' attribute value for navigation
headers. Betty gets the source view of the current page and searches
for the specific phrase used in a navigation list to find the class
associated with the navigation list.

Joe, a user with a distraction disorder, is taking an online exam. He
is working on the 6th question when he realizes he wrote something
wrong in the essay on question 2. He uses the local search in the
browser to find the text in error inside the textarea of question 2.

Sam, is a screen reader user. He has images off and the alternative
content for images is revealed. He wants to send the flow chart image
on the page to a collegue. Sam searches for the word "flowchart" that
he heard spoken as part of the 'alt' text for the image. He then uses
the context menu to select the address of the image and sends it to a
colleague.

Agnes is deaf. She is watching a video with captions turned on. Agnes
uses the search function to seach through the captions and jump to the
point in the video where the search term is located in the time line.

Greta, has a reading impairment. She is trying efficient locate some
information in a large detailed graphic. She is using a browser with
native support for SVG. Greta searches for a term and the SVG is
searched along with html content.

gl: add People who have difficulty reading or are slow reader rely
more on search to efficiently gain meaning from the content rather
than scanning

<greg> People who read slowly or with difficulty due to a disability
rely more heavily on the ability to search for the text they're
looking for, rather than scanning or reading an entire document to
find it.

Local find in a user agent allows the user to easily locate desired
information in rendered content. People who read slowly or with
difficulty due to a disability rely more heavily on the ability to
search for the text they're looking for, rather than scanning or
reading an entire document to find it. The ability to search for
alternative text content allows screen reader users to find...

scribe: content they heard on their speaker. Users with hearing
impairment use find as an efficient method of jumping to specific
points in a video.

<greg> as well as allowing users with more moderate visual impairments
locate images that they would have difficulty distinguishing by visual
means alone.

Local find in a user agent allows the user to easily locate desired
information in rendered content. People who read or navigate slowly or
with difficulty due to a disability rely more heavily on the ability
to search for the text they're looking for, rather than scanning or
reading an entire document to find it. The ability to search for
alternative text content allows screen reader users...

scribe: to find content they heard on their speaker. Users with
hearing impairment use find as an efficient method of jumping to
specific points in a video.

<jeanne> The user is using a browser with native support for SVG. when
searching the SVG is searched along with html content.

<jeanne> Users who find it difficult to use the mouse or keyboard and
have to limit their physical operations will save movements using
search.

<mhakkinen> question: is anything said in the examples as to how
search hits are highlighted and position indicated, for example, an
organiztional chart rendered in SVG?

Local find in a user agent allows the user to easily locate desired
information in rendered content. People who read or navigate slowly or
with difficulty due to a disability rely more heavily on the ability
to search for text, rather than scanning or reading an entire document
to find it. In addition, the ability to search alternative content
allows screen reader users to find content they...

scribe: heard on their speaker. And users with hearing impairment use
find as an efficient method of jumping to specific points in a video.

<jeanne> Greg: Mark, funny you should bring up SVG

<mhakkinen> and don't get me started on canvas ;)

Local find in a user agent allows the user to easily locate desired
information in rendered content. People who read or navigate slowly or
with difficulty due to a disability rely more heavily on the ability
to search for text, rather than scanning or reading an entire document
to find it. In addition, the ability to search alternative content
allows screen reader users to find content they...

scribe: heard on their speaker. And users with hearing impairment use
find as an efficient method of jumping to specific points in a video.
Users who find it difficult to use the mouse or keyboard and have to
limit their physical operations will save movements using search.

kf: remove the word 'local'

gl: can't just say 'find in a user agent..." should say 'the find
function in a user agent..." or "the ability to search for text in a
user agent...."

<jeanne> The find or search function in a user agent allows the user
to easily locate desired information in rendered content. People who
read or navigate slowly or with difficulty due to a disability rely
more heavily on the ability to search for text, rather than scanning
or reading an entire document to find it. The ability to search
alternative content allows screen reader users to find content they
heard on their speaker. Users with hearing impairments use find as an

resolved: intent for 2.4.1 is as above

<jeanne> ...as an efficient method of jumping to specific points in a
video. Users who find it difficult to use the mouse or keyboard and
have to limit their physical operations will save movements using
search.

examples

a. Marvin is dexterity impaired. He needs to move efficiently to
specific text in the document. The user agent provides a local search
function that is available using speech commands. Marvin says "find,"
a text box with a search button appears. He spells the word he is
looking for, and says "enter", which executes the search function.

a. Marvin is dexterity impaired. He needs to move efficiently to
specific text in the document. The user agent provides a local search
function that is available using speech commands. Marvin says "find
box," a text box with a search button appears. He speaks the word he
is looking for, and says "find text", which executes the search
function.

a. Marvin is dexterity impaired. He needs to move efficiently to
specific text in the document. The user agent provides a local search
function that is available using speech commands. Marvin says "find
box," a text box with a search button appears. He speaks the word he
is looking for, and says "enter", which executes the search function.

Betty, who is low vision, is attempting to create a user stylesheet
for site. She need to know the 'class' attribute value for navigation
headers. Betty gets the source view of the current page and searches
for the specific phrase used in a navigation list to find the class
associated with the navigation list.

Betty, who is low vision, is attempting to create a user stylesheet
for site. She need to know the 'class' attribute value for navigation
headers. Betty gets the source view of the current page and searches
for the specific phrase used in a navigation list to find the class
associated with the element.

jr: the sc does not say anything about searching in a source view.

gl: the browser renders the source view, it is just a different presentation.

js: examples are informative or best practices.

kf: source is another type of rendering

Joe, a user with a distraction disorder, is taking an online exam. He
is working on the 6th question when he realizes he wrote something
wrong in the essay on question 2. He uses the local search in the
browser to find the text in error inside the textarea of question 2.

ja: there is 'local' search, remove it

Sam, is a screen reader user. He has images off and the alternative
content for images is revealed. He wants to send the flow chart image
on the page to a collegue. Sam searches for the word "flowchart" that
he heard spoken as part of the 'alt' text for the image. He then uses
the context menu to select the address of the image and sends it to a
colleague.

Agnes is deaf. She is watching a video with captions turned on. Agnes
uses the search function to seach through the captions and jump to the
point in the video where the search term is located in the time line.

Greta, has a reading impairment. She is trying efficient locate some
information in a large detailed graphic. She is using a browser with
native support for SVG. Greta searches for a term and the SVG is
searched along with html content.

in IE 9 the text in the SVG that had text was highlighted.

<mhakkinen> ok

Greta, has a reading impairment. She is trying to efficiently locate
some information in a large, detailed graphic. She is using a browser
with native support for SVG. Greta searches for a term and the text
within SVG is searched along with html content.

in FF the point of regard is moved to the text in the SVG but it is
not highlighted in any way

we don't have any examples of SVG with alt text to see what happens with search.

we tested in FF and IE turned images off, but SVG remained on the screen

<mhakkinen> in chrome, the text is found but not highlighted

same as FF

<mhakkinen> probably Safari, then, too.

they would both fail the other SC relating to highlighting found search terms

discussion of the Summary of GL2

resolved: add above examples to the IER of 2.4.1

kf: 2.4.3 this needs some work

<mhakkinen> fyi... safari highlights and positions. cool effect.

awesome.

<mhakkinen> yes.

kf: 2.4.5 is confusing, need rewriting, parts are redundant to 2.4.1,
This is only place where search by case is mentioned

<jeanne> http://www.w3.org/WAI/UA/work/wiki/Browser_Compliance_Notes

<Admin> 1.8.Y: Reflowing Zoom: The user can request that when
reflowable content in a graphical viewport is rescaled, it is reflowed
such that one dimension of the content fits within the height or width
of the viewport. (Level AA) ## DONE 26 April - need IER

<Admin> Note: User agents are encouraged to allow user to override
author instructions to not wrap content (e.g., nowrap).

<Admin> Intent for 1.8.1:

<Admin> Itís important that when content is reflowed it remains easily
usable. Content is not easily usable if the user has to scroll back
and forth to see a single line of text. This is an especially acute
issue for users who find it difficult or impossible to use the mouse
to scroll and for users who find it difficult to reorient when the
content changes.

<Admin> Examples for 1.8.1:

<Admin> Frank has repetitive strain injuries and uses speech input. As
he's gotten older he sometimes needs to increase the font size to
comfortably read text on his computer screen. If the text does not
flow properly, he finds himself overusing his voice to carry out
multiple speech commands to carry out scrolling commands for every
line of text, exacerbating his repetitive strain injuries by using...

<Admin> ...the mouse, or simply giving up.

<Admin> Maggie has cognitive issues that make it difficult for her to
reorient when the computer screen changes. She occasionally zooms in
to read small text. She finds it easier to reorient after zooming when
at least one dimension of the content fits within the height or width
of the viewport.
I.8.Y ier above

<Jan> +1 to 1.8.Y intent

<Admin> Frank has repetitive strain injuries and uses speech input. As
he's gotten older he sometimes needs to increase the font size to
comfortably read text on his computer screen. If the text does not
flow properly, he finds himself overusing his voice to carry out
multiple speech commands to carry out scrolling commands for every
line of text, exacerbatinghis injuries by using...

<Admin> <Admin> ...the mouse, or simply giving up.

<Admin> Frank has repetitive strain injuries and uses speech input. As
he's gotten older he sometimes needs to increase the font size to
comfortably read text on his computer screen. If the text does not
flow properly, he finds himself overusing his voice to carry out
multiple speech commands to, exacerbating his repetitive strain
injuries by using...

<Admin> <Admin> ...the mouse, or simply giving up.

<Admin> Frank has repetitive strain injuries and uses speech input. As
he's gotten older he sometimes needs to increase the font size to
comfortably read text on his computer screen. If the text does not
flow properly, he overuses his voice to carry out multiple speech
commands, exacerbates his injuries by using the mouse, or simply gives
up.

Frank has repetitive strain injuries and uses speech input. As he's
gotten older he sometimes needs to increase the font size to
comfortably read text on his computer screen. If the text does not
flow properly, he overuses his voice to carry out multiple speech
commands, or uses the mouse exacerbating his injuries, or simply gives
up.

<Admin> Frank has repetitive strain injuries and uses speech input. As
he's gotten older he sometimes needs to increase the font size to
comfortably read text on his computer screen. If the text does not
flow properly, he overuses his voice to carry out multiple speech
commands, or uses the mouse which exacerbates his injuries, or simply
gives up.

editorial review of 1.8.y

gl: by stating that the user can request in 1.8.y, are we implying
that reflowing can be turned off
... review wording....is it saying, always, available, or ??? (neither
require nor prohibit the reflowing of content

resolved:

<jeanne> Intent for 1.8.Y (1.8.13) Itís important that when content is
reflowed it remains easily usable. Content is not easily usable if the
user has to scroll back and forth to see a single line of text. This
is an especially acute issue for users who find it difficult or
impossible to use the mouse to scroll and for users who find it
difficult to reorient when the content changes. This does not require
or prohibit the user agent from providing an option to turn off r
2.7.6 change preference settings outside UAUI

<greg> Intent for 2.7.6: Users with a disability may find that they
cannot use a user agent with its current preference settings. This can
occur when they are initially setting up the product and its default
settings don't meet their needs, or after they, or another product or
user, change an option from the setting they need. In these cases they
may not be able to user the user agent's own user...

<greg> ...interface to adjust the settings, and so need a way to
adjust or reset those options from outside the user agent. There are
multiple ways this can be accomplished including: detecting and
implementing the platform accessibility settings, providing an
external file to modify, access to settings from a separate utility
program, providing accessibility options in the installation program,
or...

<greg> ...providing command-line switches to change the user agent's behavior.

<greg> Users with a disability may find that they cannot use a user
agent with its current preference settings. This can occur when they
are initially setting up the product and its default settings don't
meet their needs, or after they, or another product or user, change an
option from the setting they need. In these cases they may not be able
to user the user agent's own user interface to adjust...

<greg> ...the settings, and so need a way to adjust or reset those
options from outside the user agent. There are multiple ways this can
be accomplished including: detecting and implementing the platform
accessibility settings, providing an external file to modify,
providing access to settings from a separate utility program,
providing accessibility options in the installation program, or
providing...

<greg> ...command-line switches to change the user agent's behavior.

<greg> Aosa is blind, and her web browser is incompatible with her
screen reader unless she changes one of the browser's advanced
settings. Because she cannot activate and use the appropriate dialog
box until the setting is changed, she needs to start the browser using
a dedicated command-line switch that changes the behavior.

<greg> Bintu is deaf and enjoys watching captioned videos. Since
different video players may not have accessible settings, she sets her
browser to always display captions, and hopes that the video player
does not override the browser settings. In this way the options in one
user agent (the embedded video player) are set outside its user
interface by being set in another program (the hosting browser).

<greg> Bintu is deaf and enjoys watching captioned videos. Since
different video players may not have accessible settings, she sets her
browser to always display captions, knowing the video player will not
override the browser settings. In this way the options in one user
agent (the embedded video player) are set outside its user interface
by being set in another program (the hosting browser).

<greg> Bintu is deaf and enjoys watching captioned videos. Since
different video players may not have accessible settings, she sets her
browser to always display captions, and hopes that the video player
will respect the browser's request to to display captions. In this way
the options in one user agent (the embedded video player) are set
outside its user interface by being set in another program...

<greg> ...(the hosting browser).

<greg> intu is deaf and enjoys watching captioned videos. Since
different video players may not have accessible settings, she sets her
browser to always display captions, knowing the video player will
respect the browser's request to to display captions. In this way the
options in one user agent (the embedded video player) are set outside
its user interface by being set in another program (the...

<greg> ...hosting browser).

<greg> Sasha requires high contrast to be able to discriminate the
shape of letters. She has set the accessibility preferences on her
mobile phone to use the high contrast mode. When she launches her
mobile browser, it detects that she is using high contrast and adjusts
the font and color settings for its user interface to reflect those
settings.

<greg> Justin has an attention deficit disorder. He is setting up his
new e-book reader and is interrupted while setting the default font
colors, then finds he accidentally sets his background and font color
to white on white. He cannot read the settings screen to recover his
default settings, so he exits the reader and follows the instructions
on the vendor's web site to edit the "settings.ini"...

<greg> ...file to adjust the colors. He then restarts the reader with
the corrected color settings.

close Action-640

<trackbot> ACTION-640 Smith the IER for 2.7.6 closed
Action-641 IER for 2.7.7

http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0046.html

close action-641

<trackbot> ACTION-641 Wordsmith 2.7.7 closed

gl: intent does not match the sc wording

all the preferences that apply to the compatible system will be transferred.

<greg> "The user can transfer preference settings" is vague enough
that a UA could comply by transferring only two settings.

<greg> We could make it (a) all preference settings that are
compatible with the target system, or (b) all accessibility preference
settings that are compatible with the target system ("accessibility
settings" being defined as those required to comply with this
document.

<greg> Someone argued that since it's AAA we might as well make it broad.

<greg> Kelly points out support difficulties.

kf: IE manage addons, if I turn off yahoo toolbar, transfer settings.
then 3 months later the user installs the toolbar it will be turned
off after installation.
... this will cause users issues
... this is architected this way.
... is this is some setting or all settings

gl: suggested that it is AAA and go with all settings

<greg> "The user can transfer all compatible preference settings
between computers. (Level AAA)"?

kp: in perfect world when the user install the toolbar, it should be
flagged and tell the user...you have this feature disabled, do you
want to turn it on

<greg> Kelly says should be UA settings.

<greg> ""The user can transfer all compatible user agent preference
settings between computers. (Level AAA)"

resolved: change wording of 2.7.7 to be the above.

http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2012AprJun/0046.html

Intent: Configuring a user agent is a complex...

<jeanne> Configuring a user agent may be a complex and time consuming
task. Some users hire assistive technology professional trainers to do
their system setup. Users who have spent time customizing
accessibility preferences to meet their requirements need to easily
migrate preference setting to another compatible device. Schools and
universities also need to maintain accessibility settings across
multiple machines.
Summary of Action Items
[End of minutes]


-- 
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator & Webmaster
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
voice 512.206.9315††† fax: 512.206.9264† http://www.tsbvi.edu/
"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964
Received on Monday, 4 June 2012 22:30:51 GMT

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