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Re: [css-color] wider/deeper colors

From: Chris Lilley <chris@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 16:05:59 +0100
Message-ID: <871590243.20160216160559@w3.org>
To: Florian Rivoal <florian@rivoal.net>
CC: "Tab Atkins Jr." <jackalmage@gmail.com>, Dean Jackson <dino@apple.com>, www-style list <www-style@w3.org>
Hello Florian,

Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 12:36:37 PM, you wrote:
>> On Feb 16, 2016, at 18:06, Chris Lilley <chris@w3.org> wrote:
>> Or more generally, and sidestepping the issue of trademarked lists of
>> names, it would be good if "named color" profiles were supported.
>> 
>> Pantone happens to be one example which could be implemented like
>> that, technically, if the license conditions allowed it which they
>> don't.

> Sure, I'm am just taking Pantone as an example to illustrate the point.

Ok, just wanted to make it clear that the issues with pantone are
legal not technical.

> The remaining question is how would this be declared. Do ICC profiles
> have a way of defining named colors?

Yes, there is a particular type of profile called a named color
profile, which is what I was referring to above.

Instead of a set of curves and chromaticities (for an RGB profile) or
a set of Lab measurements of CMKY swatches (i.e a 4D lookup table, for
a CMYK profile), it consists of a one dimensional list of names
(strings) and colors in Lab or XYZ.

http://www.colorwiki.com/wiki/The_7_ICC_Profile_Types#Named_Color_Profiles

For an earlier run at specifying this, see
https://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-SVG2-20140211/color.html#named
(note that SVG required an explicit sRGB fallback each time, which is
not needed here because CSS can express a fallback in the usual way).


-- 
Best regards,
 Chris  Lilley
 Technical Director, W3C Interaction Domain
Received on Tuesday, 16 February 2016 15:06:11 UTC

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