W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > July 2013

Re: [css3-page] Styling elements differently based on whether they appear on a left or right page

From: Brad Kemper <brad.kemper@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2013 07:51:13 -0700
Message-Id: <9A9CEF65-34C9-414A-A9EB-18152ECD4E7F@gmail.com>
Cc: Alan Stearns <stearns@adobe.com>, Håkon Wium Lie <howcome@opera.com>, Lea Verou <lea@w3.org>, www-style list <www-style@w3.org>
To: Håkon Wium Lie <howcome@opera.com>
On Jul 30, 2013, at 12:49 AM, Håkon Wium Lie <howcome@opera.com> wrote:

> Alan Stearns wrote:
> 
>>> Using flexbox is fine, too. Or CSS tables.
>> 
>> I think flex and grid are much better suited to layout than floats or
>> tables.
> 
> I'd like to see how you achieve these four common use cases:

I think you are missing the point, Håkon. Nobody is saying grid has to replace every use of floats. But typically designers like to carve up a page into abutting content areas, and then style (or not) the sections themselves (such as with borders and backgrounds around/behind the entire section), as well as style (or not) content based on which of these sections it's in. Slicing up the page into distinct areas like that, and determining what goes where within those areas, is typically what we mean by layout. Something like grid is much better suited for this task than the features like float that we've had to hack towards this purpose in the past. I'm surprised you think of this as controversial.

Do you consider grid a threat to some of the ideas in gcpm? I don't. Just because grid is better suited for sidebar layouts does not mean that we will stop using floats for figures, images (such as your Alice in Wonderland example), pull quotes, and the like. Appropriate tools are needed for the varied design tasks at hand. I think it would still be useful to float pictures, etc. to the top of a page or multi-col box, and span some number of columns, or float something into a margin, without having to repeat the pain of hacking floats into full-height sidebars.
Received on Tuesday, 30 July 2013 14:51:44 UTC

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