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Re: Are All Capital Letters accessible?

From: Jim Allan <jimallan@tsbvi.edu>
Date: Tue, 9 May 2017 14:37:51 -0500
Message-ID: <CA+=z1W=uV=D-YWwvbOsBJFdBWvWvWE6Oaq33ApZm3WBMRusfqg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Andrew Arch <andrew.arch@digital.gov.au>
Cc: WAI Interest Group List list <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Then, there is this spanner in the works
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042698907002830
Letter case and text legibility in normal and low vision
Volume 47, Issue 19
<http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00426989/47/19>, September
2007, Pages 2499–2505

It is thought by cognitive scientists and typographers alike, that
lower-case text is more legible than upper-case. Yet lower-case letters
are, on average, smaller in height and width than upper-case characters,
which suggests an upper-case advantage. Using a single unaltered font and
all upper-, all lower-, and mixed-case text, we assessed size thresholds
for words and random strings, and reading speeds for text with normal and
visually impaired participants. Lower-case thresholds were roughly 0.1 log
unit higher than upper. Reading speeds were higher for upper- than for
mixed-case text at sizes twice acuity size; at larger sizes, the upper-case
advantage disappeared. Results suggest that upper-case is more legible than
the other case styles, especially for visually-impaired readers, because
smaller letter sizes can be used than with the other case styles, with no
diminution of legibility.

On Mon, May 8, 2017 at 9:38 PM, Andrew Arch <andrew.arch@digital.gov.au>
wrote:

> Here's are some short articles that counter the initial Myth
> <http://www.blog.theteamw.com/2009/12/23/100-things-you-should-know-about-people-19-its-a-myth-that-all-capital-letters-are-inherently-harder-to-read/>
> one. Not peer reviewed, but supports many of the points made already.
>
>    - Writing readable content (and why All Caps is so hard to read)
>    <https://www.mity.com.au/blog/writing-readable-content-and-why-all-caps-is-so-hard-to-read>
>     [1]
>    - Why Text in All Caps Is Hard for Users to Read
>    <http://uxmovement.com/content/all-caps-hard-for-users-to-read/> [2]
>    - How We Read <https://alistapart.com/article/how-we-read> [3]
>
> And personally, I find them harder to read!
>
> Andrew
>
> [1] https://www.mity.com.au/blog/writing-readable-content-and-
> why-all-caps-is-so-hard-to-read
> [2] http://uxmovement.com/content/all-caps-hard-for-users-to-read/
> [3] https://alistapart.com/article/how-we-read
>
> -------------------
>
> Andrew Arch
>
> Accessibility & Inclusivity Lead
>
> Digital Transformation Agency (DTA)
>
> Australian Government
>
> www.dta.gov.au
> p. +61 (0)428 134 529 t. @DTA <https://twitter.com/DTA>  |  @amja
> <https://twitter.com/amja>
>
> On 9 May 2017 at 10:59, Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com> wrote:
>
>> reliable reference needed?  OK, does any one on this list think that all
>> upper case sentences as easier to read  - vote yes?
>>
>> so far no yes responses, so the nay's have it!
>>
>> A reliable study conducted May 2017 proves nearly no one likes all upper
>> case for reading for a variety of reasons.
>>
>> Note: the question was not:
>> 1. are upper case *letters* harder to read
>> 2. are upper case *words* harder to read
>> 3. *read* was not defined as only visual reading print, and includes,
>> because of this list's audience, considerations for print disabled.
>> 4. I forgot the 4th point
>> ___________
>> Regards,
>> Phill Jenkins
>> Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive
>> IBM Accessibility Research
>>
>
>


-- 
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
voice 512.206.9315    fax: 512.206.9264  http://www.tsbvi.edu/
"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964
Received on Tuesday, 9 May 2017 19:38:28 UTC

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