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RE: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia

From: David Best <davebest@cogeco.ca>
Date: Wed, 3 May 2017 09:41:45 -0400
To: "'Sandra Evans'" <sandra@barking.ca>, "'Brian Bors'" <b.bors@accessibility.nl>
Cc: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <00b701d2c413$014afcc0$03e0f640$@cogeco.ca>
Sandra, you may find the following resources helpful.

 

Typefaces for Dyslexia, by Lynette Penney | Oct 18, 2012

http://www.iansyst.co.uk/articles/article/articles/2012/10/18/fonts-for-dyslexia

 

Web Design for Dyslexia

https://www.dyslexia.com/about-dyslexia/

 

 

From: Sandra Evans [mailto:sandra@barking.ca] 
Sent: May 3, 2017 09:07 AM
To: Brian Bors
Cc: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia

 

Hi Brian

Can you provide some examples of the fonts you are referring to? 

Thanks,

Sandra




Sandra Evans

Web Team Associate

Barking Dog Studios

21 Nottingham Street, Guelph, ON N1H 3M6

519.766.0215 

www.barking.ca

Like Barking Dog Studios on Facebook! <https://www.facebook.com/bdstudioinc/>  

 

 

On Wed, May 3, 2017 at 8:57 AM, Brian Bors <b.bors@accessibility.nl> wrote:

Greetings Juliette,

Apart from the excellent answers already stated I would also like to point out SC 1.4.5. 

Users with dyslexia are slowly starting to use one of the dyslexia fonts out there (especially if they have trouble with "flipping" letters and numbers like 9 and 6 for example.). Following SC 1.4.5 (among other SC) makes sure that people have the ability to use the font of their choice to read any text on a webpage.

But yes. Forgetting about dyslexia and applying universal design instead is probably the wiser choice in general.

Greetings,



Brian Bors

Accessibility foundation - the Netherlands

 

2017-05-02 23:08 GMT+02:00 Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>:

Jonathan makes a good point: "This is why the WAI has released a number of documents as non-normative notes to assist the community."
and may I add, the  <https://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/conformance.html#uc-levels-head> Level AAA WCAG Success Criteria, which can be applied some of the time to some of the content that will additionally benefit users with Dyslexia.  

and, a call for help, 

I seem to have lost my cross-reference of WCAG Success Criteria by Disability Type, Its a table that shows the disability that benefits from conformance to that Success Criteria.  There was a reference (table or spreadsheet) that listed the disabilities by WCAG Success Criteria, and a list of Disabilities and the WCAG Success Criteria that were benefitted.  I thought is was once in the TEITACC report [Note 1]. Any links anyone?  
I think Dyslexia and/or Cognitive/language/learning was on the cross reference table/spreadsheet. 

The TEITACC does list Disabilities – The disabilities for which this recommendation is intended to remove barriers. 
see  <https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/background/teitac-report/6-the-recommendations#add> https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/background/teitac-report/6-the-recommendations#add
Specifically listing the following in "Disabilities: Cognitive/language/learning ", see example from provision 3-I Pausing below
but its not is an easy to use a table or sortable spreadsheet for look-up reference.

Example:
        3-I:  Pausing
       A mechanism must be provided to pause moving . . .
        Additional Information

*	Text from Web and Software
*	Source:  {508}1194.21(h)
*	Impact:  
Version 1:  Significant:  User agents provide support for this on some Web technologies. But for other Web technologies and for software, the application developer must provide this support. 
Version 2:  Not Significant once techniques are known (and by the time this is in effect) it should not be hard to do this as a routine step and will be appreciated by many mainstream as well.
*	External Reference:  Harmonized with WCAG 2.0-2.2.2 Pausing (Level AA)
*	Testability:  Inspection
*	Disabilities:  Blindness, Low vision, Cognitive/language/learning


Note 1: 508 Advisory Committee Report  <https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/background/teitac-report> https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/background/teitac-report

Does anyone have the table or spreadsheet version?
__________
Regards,
Phill Jenkins
Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive
IBM Accessibility Research
 <https://www.linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/> linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/
 <http://www.ibm.com/able> ibm.com/able
 <http://www.facebook.com/IBMAccessibility> facebook.com/IBMAccessibility
 <https://twitter.com/IBMAccess> twitter.com/IBMAccess
ageandability.com



From:        Jonathan Avila <jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com>
To:        WAI IG <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Date:        05/02/2017 02:19 PM
Subject:        RE: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia

  _____  




Ø  Why and how would you want to do that rather than just subscribing to a well-defined set of universal design criteria?
 
As good and relevant as the WCAG 2 guidelines are – there is always room to review and add to them.  In 2008 technology was at a different state and the guidelines were written to be technology agnostic to the web technology at the time.  Today new specifications such as ARIA are available and different technologies and options are available for users.  Considering the broadest set of needs that may not have been possible in 2008 but that are possible to be put into future guidelines today should and must be evaluated to make sure we increase accesss to more content for more people.  In addition, implementing best practices that cannot become formal guidelines but that may increase access is an important step as well.  There will always be useful things that can be done but for whatever reason can’t make it into the final guidelines but still provide value to some users.  This is why the WAI has released a number of documents as non-normative notes to assist the community.
 
Jonathan
 
Jonathan Avila
Chief Accessibility Officer
SSB BART Group 
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From: Lars Ballieu Christensen [ <mailto:lbc@sensus.dk> mailto:lbc@sensus.dk] 
Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 2:35 PM
To: Juliette
Cc: WAI IG
Subject: Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
 
Hi Juliette
 
I would still argue that the best approach would be to follow the general accessibility guidelines (WCAG 2) – that would address the needs most users (not all, I know). In my opinion, the alternative is problematic … having to explicitly decide which users you would want to accommodate. The visually impaired? The dyslexic? Those with motor deficiencies? … the list goes on. Why and how would you want to do that rather than just subscribing to a well-defined set of universal design criteria?
 
Venligst/Kind regards
 
Lars
----
Lars Ballieu Christensen 
Rådgiver/Adviser, Ph.D., M.Sc., Sensus ApS
Specialister i tilgængelighed/Accessibility Consultants 
Tel: +45 48 22 10 03 <tel:+45%2048%2022%2010%2003>  – Mobil: +45 40 32 68 23 - Skype: Ballieu
Mail:  <mailto:lbc@sensus.dk> lbc@sensus.dk– Web:  <http://www.sensus.dk/> www.sensus.dk< <http://www.sensus.dk/> http://www.sensus.dk/> & 
 <http://www.robobraille.org/> www.robobraille.org< <http://www.robobraille.org/> http://www.robobraille.org/>
 
Vi arbejder for et tilgængeligt og rummeligt informationssamfund
Working for an accessible and inclusive information society
 
Fra: Juliette < <mailto:piazza.juliette@gmail.com> piazza.juliette@gmail.com>
Dato: tirsdag den 2. maj 2017 kl. 18.54
Til: Lars Ballieu Christensen < <mailto:lbc@sensus.dk> lbc@sensus.dk>
Cc: WAI IG < <mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org> w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Emne: Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
Sendt igen fra: < <mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org> w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Dato for sendt igen: Tue, 02 May 2017 16:56:05 +0000
 
Hi Lars,
 
I really agree with you. The thing is I know a few companies who either want to show to the world that they are 'accessible for people with visual impairment' or 'accessible for people with dyslexia' or whatever the impairment. They think, providing a guidelines on how to make a website accessible for people with dyslexia for example will give them good publicity.. I tend to explain them that such people will all have their own way to use websites so at the end, if they really want to be 'accessible for people with dyslexia', they simply need to be accessible and following the W3C guidelines is probably the best way to do that.
Thanks for you feedback!
Best,
Juliette
 
 
On 2 May 2017 at 17:47, Lars Ballieu Christensen <lbc@sensus.dk> wrote:
Hi Juliette,
 
Accessibility as a term is usually not used to describe accommodations for particular user groups, e.g., people with dyslexia. Rather, accessibility refers to a set of universal design principles that aim to ensure that digital solutions can be used as widely as possible, irrespective of disabilities, situations and technologies. 
 
I’m sure you can find design recommendations for people with dyslexia, but in my opinion that has nothing to do with accessibility. It’s actually quite the opposite.
 
Venligst/Kind regards
 
Lars
----
Lars Ballieu Christensen 
Rådgiver/Adviser, Ph.D., M.Sc., Sensus ApS
Specialister i tilgængelighed/Accessibility Consultants 
Tel:  <tel:+45%2048%2022%2010%2003> +45 48 22 10 03 – Mobil:  <tel:+45%2040%2032%2068%2023> +45 40 32 68 23 - Skype: Ballieu
Mail:  <mailto:lbc@sensus.dk> lbc@sensus.dk– Web:  <http://www.sensus.dk/> www.sensus.dk< <http://www.sensus.dk/> http://www.sensus.dk/> & 
 <http://www.robobraille.org/> www.robobraille.org< <http://www..robobraille.org/> http://www.robobraille.org/>
 
Vi arbejder for et tilgængeligt og rummeligt informationssamfund
Working for an accessible and inclusive information society
 
Fra: Juliette < <mailto:piazza.juliette@gmail.com> piazza.juliette@gmail.com>
Dato: tirsdag den 2. maj 2017 kl. 18.13
Til: <undisclosed-recipients:;>
Emne: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
Sendt igen fra: < <mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org> w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Dato for sendt igen: Tue, 02 May 2017 16:14:46 +0000
 
Hello,
 
Is there any guidelines to make a website accessible for people with dyslexia?
My thoughts are that people with dyslexia can use a wide range of assistive technologies or no assistive technology at all. For this reason, making a website accessible for people with dyslexia leads to entirely follow the W3C guidelines. But, is there any specific standards or criteria for people with dyslexia?
Thanks a lot.
 
-- 
Juliette


 
-- 
Juliette



 

 
Received on Wednesday, 3 May 2017 13:42:20 UTC

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