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Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia

From: Sandra Evans <sandra@barking.ca>
Date: Wed, 3 May 2017 09:47:36 -0400
Message-ID: <CAMVo9fPjWExnmytWTW4Fn6rnRKHT4p7ZryxvX0y-Zx_W=u967g@mail.gmail.com>
To: davebest@cogeco.ca
Cc: Brian Bors <b.bors@accessibility.nl>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Thanks everyone!

Sandra

Sandra Evans
Web Team Associate

*Barking Dog Studios*

*21 Nottingham Street, Guelph, ON N1H 3M6*
519.766.0215
www.barking.ca

*Like Barking Dog Studios on Facebook!
<https://www.facebook.com/bdstudioinc/> *


On Wed, May 3, 2017 at 9:41 AM, David Best <davebest@cogeco.ca> wrote:

> Sandra, you may find the following resources helpful.
>
>
>
> Typefaces for Dyslexia, by Lynette Penney | Oct 18, 2012
>
> http://www.iansyst.co.uk/articles/article/articles/
> 2012/10/18/fonts-for-dyslexia
>
>
>
> Web Design for Dyslexia
>
> https://www.dyslexia.com/about-dyslexia/
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Sandra Evans [mailto:sandra@barking.ca]
> *Sent:* May 3, 2017 09:07 AM
> *To:* Brian Bors
> *Cc:* w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>
> *Subject:* Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
>
>
>
> Hi Brian
>
> Can you provide some examples of the fonts you are referring to?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sandra
>
>
> Sandra Evans
>
> Web Team Associate
>
> *Barking Dog Studios*
>
> *21 Nottingham Street, Guelph, ON N1H 3M6*
>
> 519.766.0215 <(519)%20766-0215>
>
> www.barking.ca
>
> *Like Barking Dog Studios on Facebook!
> <https://www.facebook.com/bdstudioinc/> *
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, May 3, 2017 at 8:57 AM, Brian Bors <b.bors@accessibility.nl>
> wrote:
>
> Greetings Juliette,
>
> Apart from the excellent answers already stated I would also like to point
> out SC 1.4.5.
>
> Users with dyslexia are slowly starting to use one of the dyslexia fonts
> out there (especially if they have trouble with "flipping" letters and
> numbers like 9 and 6 for example.). Following SC 1.4.5 (among other SC)
> makes sure that people have the ability to use the font of their choice to
> read any text on a webpage.
>
> But yes. Forgetting about dyslexia and applying universal design instead
> is probably the wiser choice in general.
>
> Greetings,
>
> Brian Bors
>
> Accessibility foundation - the Netherlands
>
>
>
> 2017-05-02 23:08 GMT+02:00 Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>:
>
> Jonathan makes a good point: "This is why the WAI has released a number
> of documents as non-normative notes to assist the community."
> and may I add, the Level AAA WCAG Success Criteria
> <https://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/conformance.html#uc-levels-head>,
> which can be applied some of the time to some of the content that will
> additionally benefit users with Dyslexia.
>
> and, a call for help,
>
> I seem to have lost my cross-reference of WCAG Success Criteria by
> Disability Type, Its a table that shows the disability that benefits from
> conformance to that Success Criteria.  There was a reference (table or
> spreadsheet) that listed the disabilities by WCAG Success Criteria, and a
> list of Disabilities and the WCAG Success Criteria that were benefitted.  I
> thought is was once in the TEITACC report [Note 1]. Any links anyone?
> I think Dyslexia and/or Cognitive/language/learning was on the cross
> reference table/spreadsheet.
>
> The TEITACC does list Disabilities – The disabilities for which this
> recommendation is intended to remove barriers.
> see https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/
> communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/background/
> teitac-report/6-the-recommendations#add
> Specifically listing the following in "Disabilities: Cognitive/language/learning
> ", see example from provision 3-I Pausing below
> but its not is an easy to use a table or sortable spreadsheet for look-up
> reference.
>
> Example:
>         3-I:  Pausing
>        A mechanism must be provided to pause moving . . .
>         Additional Information
>
>    - Text from Web and Software
>    - Source:  {508}1194.21(h)
>    - Impact:
>    Version 1:  Significant:  User agents provide support for this on some
>    Web technologies. But for other Web technologies and for software, the
>    application developer must provide this support.
>    Version 2:  Not Significant once techniques are known (and by the time
>    this is in effect) it should not be hard to do this as a routine step and
>    will be appreciated by many mainstream as well.
>    - External Reference:  Harmonized with WCAG 2.0-2.2.2 Pausing (Level
>    AA)
>    - Testability:  Inspection
>    - *Disabilities:  Blindness, Low vision, Cognitive/language/learning*
>
>
> Note 1: 508 Advisory Committee Report https://www.access-board.gov/
> guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-
> the-ict-refresh/background/teitac-report
>
> Does anyone have the table or spreadsheet version?
> __________
> Regards,
> Phill Jenkins
> Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive
> IBM Accessibility Research
> linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/ <https://www.linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/>
> ibm.com/able <http://www.ibm.com/able>
> facebook.com/IBMAccessibility <http://www.facebook.com/IBMAccessibility>
> twitter.com/IBMAccess
> ageandability.com
>
>
>
> From:        Jonathan Avila <jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com>
> To:        WAI IG <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> Date:        05/02/2017 02:19 PM
> Subject:        RE: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
> ------------------------------
>
>
>
>
> Ø  Why and how would you want to do that rather than just subscribing to
> a well-defined set of universal design criteria?
>
> As good and relevant as the WCAG 2 guidelines are – there is always room
> to review and add to them.  In 2008 technology was at a different state and
> the guidelines were written to be technology agnostic to the web technology
> at the time.  Today new specifications such as ARIA are available and
> different technologies and options are available for users.  Considering
> the broadest set of needs that may not have been possible in 2008 but that
> are possible to be put into future guidelines today should and must be
> evaluated to make sure we increase accesss to more content for more
> people.  In addition, implementing best practices that cannot become formal
> guidelines but that may increase access is an important step as well.
> There will always be useful things that can be done but for whatever reason
> can’t make it into the final guidelines but still provide value to some
> users.  This is why the WAI has released a number of documents as
> non-normative notes to assist the community.
>
> Jonathan
>
> Jonathan Avila
> Chief Accessibility Officer
> SSB BART Group
> jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com
> 703.637.8957 <(703)%20637-8957> (Office)
>
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>
> *From:* Lars Ballieu Christensen [mailto:lbc@sensus.dk <lbc@sensus.dk>]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, May 02, 2017 2:35 PM
> *To:* Juliette
> *Cc:* WAI IG
> *Subject:* Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
>
> Hi Juliette
>
> I would still argue that the best approach would be to follow the general
> accessibility guidelines (WCAG 2) – that would address the needs most users
> (not all, I know). In my opinion, the alternative is problematic … having
> to explicitly decide which users you would want to accommodate. The
> visually impaired? The dyslexic? Those with motor deficiencies? … the list
> goes on. Why and how would you want to do that rather than just subscribing
> to a well-defined set of universal design criteria?
>
> Venligst/Kind regards
>
> Lars
> ----
> Lars Ballieu Christensen
> Rådgiver/Adviser, Ph.D., M.Sc., Sensus ApS
> Specialister i tilgængelighed/Accessibility Consultants
> Tel: +45 48 22 10 03 <+45%2048%2022%2010%2003> – Mobil: +45 40 32 68 23
> <+45%2040%2032%2068%2023> - Skype: Ballieu
> Mail: lbc@sensus.dk– Web: www.sensus.dk<http://www.sensus.dk/> &
> www.robobraille.org<http://www.robobraille.org/>
>
> Vi arbejder for et tilgængeligt og rummeligt informationssamfund
> Working for an accessible and inclusive information society
>
> *Fra: *Juliette <piazza.juliette@gmail.com>
> *Dato: *tirsdag den 2. maj 2017 kl. 18.54
> *Til: *Lars Ballieu Christensen <lbc@sensus.dk>
> *Cc: *WAI IG <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> *Emne: *Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
> *Sendt igen fra: *<w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> *Dato for sendt igen: *Tue, 02 May 2017 16:56:05 +0000
>
> Hi Lars,
>
> I really agree with you. The thing is I know a few companies who either
> want to show to the world that they are 'accessible for people with visual
> impairment' or 'accessible for people with dyslexia' or whatever the
> impairment. They think, providing a guidelines on how to make a website
> accessible for people with dyslexia for example will give them good
> publicity.. I tend to explain them that such people will all have their own
> way to use websites so at the end, if they really want to be 'accessible
> for people with dyslexia', they simply need to be accessible and following
> the W3C guidelines is probably the best way to do that.
> Thanks for you feedback!
> Best,
> Juliette
>
>
> On 2 May 2017 at 17:47, Lars Ballieu Christensen <lbc@sensus.dk> wrote:
> Hi Juliette,
>
> Accessibility as a term is usually not used to describe accommodations for
> particular user groups, e.g., people with dyslexia. Rather, accessibility
> refers to a set of universal design principles that aim to ensure that
> digital solutions can be used as widely as possible, irrespective of
> disabilities, situations and technologies.
>
> I’m sure you can find design recommendations for people with dyslexia, but
> in my opinion that has nothing to do with accessibility. It’s actually
> quite the opposite.
>
> Venligst/Kind regards
>
> Lars
> ----
> Lars Ballieu Christensen
> Rådgiver/Adviser, Ph.D., M.Sc., Sensus ApS
> Specialister i tilgængelighed/Accessibility Consultants
> Tel: +45 48 22 10 03 <+45%2048%2022%2010%2003> – Mobil: +45 40 32 68 23
> <+45%2040%2032%2068%2023> - Skype: Ballieu
> Mail: lbc@sensus.dk– Web: www.sensus.dk<http://www.sensus.dk/> &
> www.robobraille.org<http://www.robobraille.org/
> <http://www..robobraille.org/>>
>
> Vi arbejder for et tilgængeligt og rummeligt informationssamfund
> Working for an accessible and inclusive information society
>
> *Fra: *Juliette <piazza.juliette@gmail.com>
> *Dato: *tirsdag den 2. maj 2017 kl. 18.13
> *Til: *<undisclosed-recipients:;>
> *Emne: *Web accessibility for people with dyslexia
> *Sendt igen fra: *<w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> *Dato for sendt igen: *Tue, 02 May 2017 16:14:46 +0000
>
> Hello,
>
> Is there any guidelines to make a website accessible for people with
> dyslexia?
> My thoughts are that people with dyslexia can use a wide range of
> assistive technologies or no assistive technology at all. For this reason,
> making a website accessible for people with dyslexia leads to entirely
> follow the W3C guidelines. But, is there any specific standards or criteria
> for people with dyslexia?
> Thanks a lot.
>
> --
> Juliette
>
>
>
> --
> Juliette
>
>
>
>
>
Received on Wednesday, 3 May 2017 13:48:13 UTC

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