W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-au@w3.org > April to June 2009

Re: I remembered what was bothering me

From: Jan Richards <jan.richards@utoronto.ca>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 15:28:59 -0400
Message-ID: <49F212FB.7090608@utoronto.ca>
To: WAI-AUWG List <w3c-wai-au@w3.org>
Hi Greg,

I've tried to take into account your comments in this rewrite (and also 
make the changes we agreed to last week):

=======================================================
PROPOSED WORDING:

ATAG 2.0 defines an "authoring tool" as any software application, part 
of an application, or collection of applications that authors interact 
with to create, modify or assemble Web content to be used by other people.

Notes on the Definition:

1. ATAG 2.0 applies to a wide variety of *Web content* generating 
applications, such as:
  - "conventional" webpage authoring tools (e.g., WYSIWYG HTML editors)
  - software for directly editing source code (e.g., text editors)
  - software for *converting* to *Web content technologies* (e.g., "Save 
as HTML" features in office suites)
  - integrated development environments (e.g., for DHTML)
  - software that generates Web content on the basis of templates, 
scripts, command-line input or wizard processes
  - software for rapidly updating portions of webpages (e.g., blogging, 
wikis, online forums)
  - software for generating/managing entire sites (e.g., content 
management systems, courseware tools, content aggregators)
  - email clients that send messages in Web content technologies
  - multimedia authoring tools

2. Any guidelines that require *authors* to modify content in some way 
always assumes that the person has *author permission*.

3. Applications that are used to create content in real time (e.g., 
chats, collaboration tools, whiteboards, etc.) should attempt to conform 
at least to Part A. In addition, many of the guidelines in Part B may 
also apply, especially if the application has an archiving feature. For 
more information, see the Techniques: Appendix E: Real-time content 
production.

=======================================================
ORIGINAL WORDING:
ATAG 2.0 defines an "authoring tool" as any application, part of an 
application, or collection of applications that authors interact with to 
create, modify or assemble Web content to be used by other people.

The definition applies to all or part of the following types of 
applications:

- WYSIWYG editors, plain text editors (embedded and stand-alone)
- conversion tools, software that can output Web content technologies 
(e.g., "Save as HTML")
- blogging tools, wikis, online forums, emailers that produce Web-content
- multimedia authoring tools
- scripting tools, widget development environment
- content management systems, courseware tools, content aggregators
- site management tools
- others

Notes on the Definition:
- Any guidelines that require authors to modify content in some way 
always assumes that the person has author permission.
- Live content authoring tools (e.g., chats, collaboration tools, 
whiteboards, etc.) are only required to meet Part A. However, many 
guidelines in Part B may still usefully apply, especially if the tool 
archives as Web content. For more information, please see the Techniques 
- Appendix E: Real-time content production.
=======================================================

Cheers,
Jan




Greg Pisocky wrote:
> Regarding classifying the authoring world into 2 categories, WYSIWYG and 
> text based. I think we need to consider a broader environment for 
> authoring content that includes such mechanisms as template driven 
> content production, dialog driven content production (wizards / prompted 
> approach), and command line, scripted authoring. The world does not fit 
> neatly into WYSIWYG and Text authoring.
>  
> 
> *Greg Pisocky*
> Accessibility Specialist
> Adobe Systems Incorporated
> 8201 Greensboro Drive, Suite 1000
> McLean, VA 22102 USA
> 703.883.2810p,   703.883.2850f
> 
> 703.678.3542c
> gpisocky@adobe.com <mailto:gpisocky@adobe.com>
> 
> www.adobe.com/accessibility <http://www.adobe.com/accessibility>
> 
>  
> 
>  

-- 
Jan Richards, M.Sc.
User Interface Design Lead
Adaptive Technology Resource Centre (ATRC)
Faculty of Information (i-school)
University of Toronto

   Email: jan.richards@utoronto.ca
   Web:   http://jan.atrc.utoronto.ca
   Phone: 416-946-7060
   Fax:   416-971-2896
Received on Friday, 24 April 2009 19:29:39 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 6 January 2015 21:39:57 UTC