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RE: Best citation format for accessibility

From: George Kerscher <kerscher@montana.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Sep 2015 11:10:14 -0600
To: "'Bill Kasdorf'" <bkasdorf@apexcovantage.com>, 'Olaf Drümmer' <olaf@druemmer.com>
Cc: "'Bill McCoy'" <bmccoy@idpf.org>, "'Robin Berjon'" <robin@berjon.com>, "'W3C Digital Publishing IG'" <public-digipub-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <00a601d0f559$8cb5e610$a621b230$@montana.com>
Hi,
 
1.	You must be able to read it and figure it out. This implies that
there is the text of the citation.
2.	It would be great to have more, like authors and title semantically
identified; this would be helpful for refreshable braille systems that would
not contract these items.
3.	Of course the link must be accessible.
 
Best
George
 
From: B
 
ill Kasdorf [mailto:bkasdorf@apexcovantage.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2015 10:29 AM
To: Olaf Drümmer
Cc: Bill McCoy; Robin Berjon; W3C Digital Publishing IG
Subject: RE: Best citation format for accessibility
 
You make a valid point; the "just read it and figure it out" approach is
certainly one strategy, though I still think being able to distinguish the
semantic components of a citation would be useful (there are typographic
cues for a sighted user—quotation marks, italics, bold journal abbreviation,
etc.). So I presume you're suggesting, that, for accessibility purposes, it
would be sufficient for a screen reader to simply know that something is a
citation and then be able to "read" it to the user? In that case I still
think they need to know how to obtain the cited resource, so at least the
link has to be accessible in itself.
 
From: Olaf Drümmer [mailto:olaf@druemmer.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2015 12:20 PM
To: Bill Kasdorf
Cc: Olaf Drümmer; Bill McCoy; Robin Berjon; W3C Digital Publishing IG
Subject: Re: Best citation format for accessibility
 
On 22 Sep 2015, at 17:50, Bill Kasdorf <bkasdorf@apexcovantage.com> wrote:




My point is that from an accessibility point of view, the components of a
citation are generally already known; the challenge is getting them from
JATS to HTML.
 
 
Why would one care from an accessibility point of view?
 
A sighted user looking at a print version (a electronic version rendered on
some screen) of a citation doesn't have that granular information provided
as part of the visual rendering.
 
Olaf
 
 
 
Received on Tuesday, 22 September 2015 17:10:58 UTC

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