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Re: You Got Your SVG in my Canvas! Mmm, Delicious!

From: Charles Pritchard <chuck@jumis.com>
Date: Thu, 07 Jul 2011 06:09:18 -0700
Message-ID: <4E15AFFE.5090405@jumis.com>
To: paniz alipour <alipourpaniz@gmail.com>
CC: "Tab Atkins Jr." <jackalmage@gmail.com>, Doug Schepers <schepers@w3.org>, public-canvas-api@w3.org
The spec contains two checkboxes as an example of focus management
and the shadow DOM.

Currently, Microsoft implements that part of the specification.
WebKit has a patch started, but needs more work before it's in the browser.

The spec example uses isPointInPath to do hit testing.

While canvas developers and many accessibility experts
would like to see this example improved, many vendor
representatives have stated that SVG should be used
exclusively of Canvas, when developing interactive widgets.

-Charles

On 7/7/2011 4:30 AM, paniz alipour wrote:
> Hello to all,
>
> Maybe you think that this question is not related to this discussion,
>
> But I want to know whether the web widget that are located on canvas,
>
> are they incredible .I mean a check box with height 70,weight 70,
>
> or no it will design as the common web widget on websites?
>
> Thanks
>
> On Thu, Jul 7, 2011 at 5:45 AM, Tab Atkins Jr. <jackalmage@gmail.com 
> <mailto:jackalmage@gmail.com>> wrote:
>
>     On Sat, Jul 2, 2011 at 10:11 PM, Charles Pritchard
>     <chuck@jumis.com <mailto:chuck@jumis.com>> wrote:
>     > On 6/30/2011 3:13 PM, Tab Atkins Jr. wrote:
>     >> Sure.  Here's a few use-cases that I've been able to extract from
>     >> emails in the threads:
>     >>
>     >> * Low- or no-vision users may have difficult reading text drawn
>     into
>     >> an image.  Solutions may involve keeping around the original
>     text, so
>     >> it can be accessed by assistive technologies on demand.
>     >>
>     >> * Low- or no-vision users may have difficulty determining the
>     >> connections between far-flung sections of a complex image, such
>     as a
>     >> graph, because they cannot easily assimilate the entire image's
>     >> information at once.  Solutions may involve annotating sections
>     of an
>     >> image with descriptions that can be accessed by assistive
>     technology
>     >> on demand.
>     >>
>     >> * Low-vision users using a magnifier to aid in resolving
>     details can't
>     >> see the entire application at once, and so don't know if
>     something is
>     >> happening that requires their attention in a part of the
>     application
>     >> that's not currently being magnified.  Solutions may involve
>     telling
>     >> the magnifier about active areas, so it can alert the user and
>     >> pan/zoom appropriately.
>     >>
>     >> Things of this nature are problems that can be solved, and we can
>     >> evaluate how well any given solution solves them.
>     >>
>     >> ~TJ
>     >>
>     > Thanks for supplying this. I missed it in my post earlier today.
>     >
>     >
>     > Let me know what kind of solutions you think are appropriate for
>     these
>     > situations.
>     > I'm quite attached to binding to the DOM, because DOM elements
>     > have ARIA bindings (as well as data-* for intra-webapp
>     communication).
>
>     Honestly, I believe the easiest solution to all three of these
>     use-cases is to "use SVG", possibly paired with "add something to
>     SVG".  #1 is solved automatically.  I believe #2 is solved by the
>     <title> and <desc> elements.  I think #3 is already solved by calling
>     .focus() on an SVG element; if not, it's pretty obvious that it would
>     be easy to solve in a similar way.
>
>     ~TJ
>
>
>
>
> -- 
> Paniz Alipour
Received on Thursday, 7 July 2011 13:09:43 UTC

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