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RE: Issue 115, exemptions, best practices

From: Shane Wiley <wileys@yahoo-inc.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2012 12:17:47 -0800
To: Jeffrey Chester <jeff@democraticmedia.org>, "public-tracking@w3.org (public-tracking@w3.org)" <public-tracking@w3.org>
Message-ID: <63294A1959410048A33AEE161379C8023D0C8ACAE1@SP2-EX07VS02.ds.corp.yahoo.com>
I strongly disagree across the board.  This states business should not be able have a quid pro quo relationship with consumers and that incentives outside of access to free content should not be allowed.  Absolutely NOT a best practice!  This working group does not have a right to dictate general business practices with respect to explicit user consent mechanisms.  Legal structures already disallow deceptive practices in this area and we've already stated this standard does not override local laws (not that it could if it wanted to).  At best this could be stated as a MAY but even that is a massive overreach in this forum.

- Shane

From: Jeffrey Chester [mailto:jeff@democraticmedia.org]
Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2012 11:06 AM
To: public-tracking@w3.org (public-tracking@w3.org)
Subject: Issue 115, exemptions, best practices

 https://www.w3.org/2011/tracking-protection/track/issues/115

[I await input from Ninja, Alan and Jim]



Best Practices for sites to manage exemptions should include:

A site must provide accurate information to users on the actual data collection and use practices of the site.  This should include all information used for tracking, targeting, sales of profiles.
A site should not suggest that the ability to access information is dependent on blanket acceptance of a site's data practices.
A site should not use "immersive" multimedia applications designed to foster opt-in as a way to encourage a user agreeing to an exemption.
A site should not use a special landing page that has been designed principally to convert a user to agree to permit an exemption.
A site should not use social media marketing to urge a user to ask their "friends" to approve exemptions.
A site should not offer rewards and incentives for a user to approve of an exemption.
Received on Wednesday, 8 February 2012 20:18:57 UTC

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