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RE: On subsetting XML...

From: Paul Cotton <pcotton@microsoft.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2003 21:12:04 -0400
Message-ID: <E7AC4500EAB7A442ABA7521D188143970632539E@tor-msg-01.northamerica.corp.microsoft.com>
To: "Mike Champion" <mc@xegesis.org>
Cc: <www-tag@w3.org>

When you quote from a thread that is 6 months old it will help TAG
members if you could give the URL of the reference.  In this case I
"think" you are quoting from an email that Norm wrote in Jan!
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-tag/2003Jan/0178.html 

The TAG's current position on this matter is documented under:
http://www.w3.org/2001/tag/ilist#xmlProfiles-29 
which post-dates the message you might have been quoting.

/paulc

Paul Cotton, Microsoft Canada 
17 Eleanor Drive, Nepean, Ontario K2E 6A3 
Tel: (613) 225-5445 Fax: (425) 936-7329 
mailto:pcotton@microsoft.com

  

> -----Original Message-----
> From: www-tag-request@w3.org [mailto:www-tag-request@w3.org] On Behalf
Of
> Mike Champion
> Sent: July 24, 2003 8:36 PM
> To: www-tag@w3.org
> Subject: Re: On subsetting XML...
> 
> 
> Norm Walsh says:
> 
> > Profiling XML, providing more implementation options, will
necessarily
> > increase the possibility of interoperability problems and it would
be
> > best to avoid doing so. Profiles are a bad idea on general
principles
> > and are in direct conflict with one of the original goals of XML[1]:
> "the
> > number of optional features in XML is to be kept to the absolute
> > minimum, ideally zero."
> 
> If this is Norm's personal opinion, I can respectfully disagree.  If
it is
> a draft
> of an official TAG finding on the subject, I personally find the tone
to
> be quite inappropriate -- a bit of a lament that the world has somehow
> failed to appreciate the pure beauty of the original specification.
> Sheesh,
> it sounds like the complaints of hard-core SGML devotees against XML
> itself 5 years ago :-)    Profiling is about *maximizing*
interoperability
> in a world where ad hoc subsetting has already occurred.
> 
> Stress the positive: the original design of
> XML has been immensely useful in a wide variety of ways that were
barely
> anticipated by the original WG.  As with everything else,
> its very success in a variety of environments led to new requirements,
> and some refactoring is necessary to fine tune it to meet those
> requirements.
> 
> 
Received on Thursday, 24 July 2003 21:12:49 UTC

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