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Re: [css3-ui] text-overflow should always crop the text when it doesn't fit into the container

From: Sebastian Zartner <sebastianzartner@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2013 11:11:20 +0200
Message-ID: <CAERejNair5bFdqnMpt=MeEv3cWcRZefPuSah=S7EV+BQZKwDiA@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Tab Atkins Jr." <jackalmage@gmail.com>
Cc: "Elika J. Etemad" <fantasai.lists@inkedblade.net>, www-style list <www-style@w3.org>, roc@ocallahan.org, tantek@cs.stanford.edu
On 17 July 2013 14:15, Tab Atkins Jr. <jackalmage@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> On Jul 17, 2013 4:22 AM, "Sebastian Zartner" <sebastianzartner@gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >
> > The current definition of text-overflow[1] says this:
> >
> > "Text can overflow for example when it is prevented from wrapping (e.g.
> due to ‘white-space:nowrap’ or a single word is too long to fit)."
> >
> > This excludes vertically overflowing text and horizontally overflowing
> text that doesn't match these two rules, which is probably the most common
> use case for this property. (keyword: texts with [more...] links)
> >
> > Example:
> > <style>
> > #test {
> >   width: 100px;
> >   height: 40px;
> >   border: 1px solid green;
> >   overflow: hidden;
> >   text-overflow: ellipsis;
> > }
> > </style>
> >
> > <p id="test">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing
> elit,</p>
> >
> > So you would expect the parts of the text that only partly fit into the
> container not to be displayed but instead see the ellipsis at the end of
> it. See the attached screenshots for an illustration.
>
> Unfortunately, this is actually a significantly different functionality
> than current text-overflow, and won't mix in well. The proposed
> 'block-overflow' property handles this. Search the mailing list for details.
>
Obviously you're referring to a discussion you started a while back[1],
which doesn't seem to have a conclusion.

Generally I think your block-overflow proposal describes the same as what I
had in mind. The question you don't answer there is why it was concluded
that ellipsizing content in the block direction is "sufficiently different"
from text-overflow.
For the example I gave changing the behavior of text-overflow would be
sufficient. Can you give examples for use cases, in which it wouldn't be
sufficient?

As I see now there was also another similar request before.[2]

Sebastian

[1] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2012Jul/0688.html
[2] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2012Jan/0627.html
Received on Thursday, 18 July 2013 09:12:07 UTC

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