W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > wai-xtech@w3.org > February 2008

Re: ALT issue redux

From: Laura Carlson <laura.lee.carlson@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2008 09:55:42 -0600
Message-ID: <1c8dbcaa0802050755x232edd80w71ded7393e127bb@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Al Gilman" <Alfred.S.Gilman@ieee.org>
Cc: wai-xtech@w3.org

Al Gilman wrote:

> By their charters, WAI groups (here WCAG) are the go-to
> experts in matters of accessibility
[snip]
> WAI are the experts on accessibility and HTML the
> experts on HTML.  For the division of labor between format and
> best practice in promoting accessible HTML, the experts need
> to work together and listen to one another.

Another recent case-in-point regarding listening and working together.

In a public comment to the HTML 5 Draft Susan Jolly wrote:

>> Either you intend to be able to handle braille correctly or not. I
>> don't  the think the view, "Oh well, the braille reader can probably
>> deal with  this," counts as accessibility.

The HTML 5 editor responded:

> I think it is too optimistic to think that Web authors will
> understand the  needs of braille users enough to cater for them. I
> also think longdesc=""  and summary="" have taught us that placing
> attributes for specific  disabilities into the language itself will
> result in overwhelming abuse to the point where the target audience
> of those features actually have to turn them off.

Source:
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html-comments/2008Feb/0004.html

I've wondered recently whatever happened to listening. I mean
authentic listening. Authentic listening occurs when a person responds
to another in ways which indicate to him that you care about what he's
saying. Authentic and empathic listening are wrapped in the same
blanket. The idea is to let the other person know without a doubt that
you are focusing your attention on his words and feelings with the
specific intent to understand his or her view.

I've also wondered recently whatever happened to the form of
discussion known as debate. I don't mean argument, or hurling insults
or making every effort to look right no matter what the facts may be.
I don't mean twisting the facts to suit a viewpoint, or selectively
choosing those points in a subject which happen to favor a position,
while ignoring the rest. I mean debate; the honest evaluation of a
subject to determine what is real, where both sides of an issue
actively and enthusiastically seek out the truth. Yes, the
truth...that which is the bottom line, the real
deal, what is actually happening and why.

Again, guidance from PFWG regarding working together and listening to
one another would be helpful. HTML5 WG actually seeking accessibility
advice from WAI, as well as the WAI offering accessibility advice on a
regular on-going basis would be most beneficial to process
improvement.

Best Regards,
Laura
Received on Tuesday, 5 February 2008 15:55:53 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.4.0 : Friday, 17 January 2020 22:25:18 UTC