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Re: courses for designers and developers.

From: Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2016 12:13:30 -0600
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Cc: klaus.miesenberger@jku.at
Message-Id: <OF86918455.5B7146D5-ON00258065.0063E686-86258065.00642086@notes.na.collabserv.com>
I also recommend speaking with Klaus, he has spent most of his 
professional life on just this topic!

E-mail: klaus.miesenberger@jku.at; WWW: http://www.jku.at/iis 

Klaus Miesenberger:
Including Assistive Technologies (AT) and Software/Web-(e)Accessibility 
into the curriculum of Computer Science and related fields has been the 
focus of my academic teaching activities. . . 
___________
Regards,
Phill Jenkins
pjenkins@us.ibm.com
Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive
IBM Research Accessibility
ibm.com/able
facebook.com/IBMAccessibility
twitter.com/IBMAccess
ageandability.com




From:   Sharron Rush <srush@knowbility.org>
To:     w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Cc:     "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Date:   11/08/2016 10:02 AM
Subject:        Re: courses for designers and developers.



Greetings all,

Yesterday, Nov 7th, the White House hosted their final Disability and 
Inclusive Technology Summit and live streamed the discussion. One of the 
panels was led by Larry Goldberg and featured two researchers who were 
working with the new TeachAccess initiative to encourage the integration 
of accessibility and inclusive design thinking in college curricula across 
disciplines to include designers, developers, programmers, engineers, 
human factors, psychology and more. Research and active programs were 
presented by Bruce Walker from Georgia Tech and Matt Huenerfauth from 
Rochester Institute of Technology. 

In my view there is nothing more important than this kind of integration 
into standard university courses across the board. TeachAccess is quite 
open and encourages participation from around the globe. You can learn 
more at http://teachaccess.org.

Best,
Sharron

 

On Tue, Nov 8, 2016 at 8:43 AM, <chaals@yandex-team.ru> wrote:
- d.birkett@, aboyd@, ludovic.giambiasi@, seanmmur@, matthew.putland@
 
Hi Alan,
 
[Please note the W3C email attachment policy asks you not to attach Word 
documents, for some fairly good reasons. But that's by the by?]
 
This is an interesting read. As I am sure you are aware it needs a bit of 
"copy-editing" to clean out the odd typo and unfinished sentence, and I 
think it would do better if it had a short summary - the introduction 
reads more like a cover letter.
 
I like the approach of moving between stuff about accessibility as an 
idea, rules, and technical standards. I think you would do well to shrink 
the bits on individual sets of regulations and policies, and consider the 
broad types of rules.
Roughly I think there are two common approaches.
 
Many sets of rules that are based on meeting a specific set of required 
checkpoints, such as having keyboard-operable controls or only using 
language from a given set of common terms. This is similar to copying and 
pasting from e.g. WCAG, then optionally editing a bit more to "suit local 
conditions". Things like Section 508 fall into this category, as well as 
checklists applied in organisations, or even a rule that says "meet WCAG X 
to level so-and-so, plus checkpoints such-and-such".
 
The other approach is typified by Australia's and the UK's law against 
discriminating on the basis of disability. Essentially they say that it is 
not lawful to offer a product or service that a person with a disability 
cannot use by reason of their disability.
 
 
A noted advantage of the first kind is that it is easier to test whether 
you have met the requirements, since they are clearly listed. A noted 
advantage of the second is that as technology evolves there is in theory 
nobody left behind while the requirements aren't updated to the new 
reality. There are other interesting aspects - if you were offering this 
to a law or behavioural economics class, you might consider the different 
schemes for enforcement and dealing with breaches of the policy, and which 
are more effective in actually reducing problems for people and in 
motivating technological development.
 
Anyway, I hope the University of Manitoba recognises the value of your 
proposals, and sees how to incorporate accessibility education both as a 
stand-alone subject and integrated as appropriate into their existing 
work.
 
cheers
 
 
08.11.2016, 13:36, "Alan Bridgeman" <a.bridgeman@hotmail.com>:
Hello,
 
I seem to be pretty late to this email chain and I'm meirly a fourth year 
computer scoence undergrad at the University of Manitoba. But I wanted to 
through my two cents in since I'm going to be trying to convince the 
university I attend (University of Manitoba) and hopefully the Canadian 
Information Processing Society (CIPS) which as I understand is the closest 
thing to a computer science program regulatory body in Canada. To include 
this kind of matterial in our computer scoence curriculim(s).
 
Now I know the OCAD University Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC) 
does education (Master degrees) on this type of stuff but I can't speak to 
this other then to say I've heard good things. Here is their website: 
http://idrc.ocadu.ca
 
Below I've included a copy of a documrnt I've written as a rough first 
draft proposal (thats been reviewed by a few people with decent standing) 
specifically for the purpose of convincing the computer science departmemy 
to include this kind of matterial in the University of Manitoba program. I 
don't know if it will help with the specific issues at hand but feel free 
to use it for your own ends or if you have time I'd really like the 
feedback on it as well.
 
Thanks for all your time.
 
Regards,
Alan Bridgeman
 
 
-------- Original message --------
From: Dean Birkett | AssistiveWare <d.birkett@assistiveware.com>
Date: 2016-11-08 5:44 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: "Boyd, Amanda (UK - Belfast)" <aboyd@deloitte.co.uk>
Cc: Ludovic GIAMBIASI <ludovic.giambiasi@gmail.com>, "Sean Murphy 
(seanmmur)" <seanmmur@cisco.com>, Matthew Putland <
matthew.putland@mediaaccess.org.au>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: Re: courses for designers and developers.
 
I find a lot of the online Accessibility courses tend to be developer 
focussed. The one Matthew mentioned is broader, and you don?t hit any code 
at all. although I wouldn?t say it is for UXers either - it?s more of a 
broad intro, and the coursework revolves around accessibility testing & 
creating accessible content (videos).
 
The free MOOC from The University of Southampton (
https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/digital-accessibility) is also quite 
broad, and it introduces you to issues faced by people with various 
impairments, but there are no real tests as such.
 
To date I?ve yet to find a course that really covers Accessibility from a 
UX perspective, which is a real shame, but I can totally recommend a 
workshop with Derek Featherstone of Simply Accessible, he helped me (a UX 
Designer with  a keen interest in Accessibility) to come at design 
problems through an Accessibility lens to create better solutions.
 
Best
Dean
 
On 8 Nov 2016, at 11:20, Boyd, Amanda (UK - Belfast) <aboyd@deloitte.co.uk
> wrote:
 
 
Hi,
 
As a web developer ? accessibility is a fundamental aspect of the web. If 
we are teaching our students front-end web development ? accessibility 
should be core to this.
 
It was covered alittle in my university course in UK, all our sites had to 
be W3C accessibility checked althought I felt the aria labels and 
voiceover accessibility could have been covered more.
 
Teaching students to solve the accessibility problems they run into when 
they are coding ? for example ? how the structure of their code regarding 
H1-H6 and the layout of forms could impact the page navigation of the user 
tabbing through while using Voiceover.
 
If we teach them to adopt this while coding ? they will adopt these 
considerations into their projects/apps before starting.
 
Everyone always leave accessibility to the end of projects as an after 
thought :(
 
Many Thanks,
Amanda Boyd
 
 
Please consider the environment before printing.
 
From: Ludovic GIAMBIASI <ludovic.giambiasi@gmail.com>
Date: Tuesday, 8 November 2016 09:49
To: "Sean Murphy (seanmmur)" <seanmmur@cisco.com>, Matthew Putland <
matthew.putland@mediaaccess.org.au>, "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <
w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Subject: Re: courses for designers and developers.
Resent-From: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Resent-Date: Tuesday, 8 November 2016 09:50
 
Hi, 
 
In all my interventions (university, private school, etc.) I include 
accessibility and UX courses. Sometimes, courses are dedicated to 
accessibility, otherwise in all programming courses, I include 
accessibility  part and ux also...
 
I'm in France...
 
Ludo,
 
Le mar. 8 nov. 2016 à 07:40, Sean Murphy (seanmmur) <seanmmur@cisco.com> a 
écrit :
Matthew
 
 
Thank you for the response. The information you have shared in relation to 
the South Australian course I was aware of and should have mention it in 
my original post. The info you shared in relation to the offerings from 
your university appears to be the status quo for Australia.
 
 
If UX and developers are not getting their teeth into this area of 
development and design at an University level. Then it is a uphill battle 
to change things without people repeating themselves over and over. Thus 
why I raised the question.
 
 
Sean Murphy
Accessibility Software engineer
seanmmur@cisco.com
Tel: +61 2 8446 7751      Cisco Systems, Inc.
The Forum 201 Pacific Highway
ST LEONARDS
2065
Australia
cisco.com          
 
 Think before you print.
This email may contain confidential and privileged material for the sole 
use of the intended recipient. Any review, use, distribution or disclosure 
by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient 
(or authorized to receive for the recipient), please contact the sender by 
reply email and delete all copies of this message.
 
From: Matthew Putland [mailto:matthew.putland@mediaaccess.org.au] 
Sent: Tuesday, 8 November 2016 4:57 PM
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: RE: courses for designers and developers.
 
> I am wondering if Universities, Third party trainers and the like cover 
accessibility in their development and UX courses? If so, is there any 
resources for different countries to indicate which training organisations 
that cover this in their courses and what level of quality the training 
is?
 
Hi Sean Murphy,
 
>From my own experience and talking with others, Accessibility training in 
web dev and UX courses are few and far between. My own I.T Degree which I 
completed at the end of 2015 only discussed accessibility for 3 marks of a 
single assignment, and that?s in my entire degree. My UX designer 
colleague from the University of Sydney had a lecture on accessibility, 
but of course 1 lecture isn?t enough to go to a very deep level.
 
There is however an online 6-week University-level course that my 
organization runs called the ?Professional Certificate of Web 
Accessibility? at the University of South Australia, which is completely 
self-promoting but may assist with what you?re looking for.
 
I?m unsure if there?s any collaboration between countries on what is 
taught accessibility-wise, but I?d say there?s still a sad lack of 
accessibility training in general for these courses.
 
Cheers,
 
Matthew Putland
Senior Analyst, Digital Accessibility | Media Access Australia
61 Kitchener Avenue, Victoria Park WA 6100
Tel: 08 9311 8230 (direct) 02 9212 6242 (main) Mobile: 0431 924 288 Web: 
www.mediaaccess.org.au
 
My working hours are from 11am-7:30pm AEST (8am-4:30pm AWST).
 
Media Access Australia - inclusion through technology and Access iQ® - 
creating a web without limits. Follow us on Twitter @mediaaccessaus
@AccessiQ
 
From: Sean Murphy (seanmmur) [mailto:seanmmur@cisco.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, 8 November 2016 9:13 AM
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: courses for designers and developers.
 
I am wondering if Universities, Third party trainers and the like cover 
accessibility in their development and UX courses? If so, is there any 
resources for different countries to indicate which training organisations 
that cover this in their courses and what level of quality the training 
is?
Sean Murphy
Accessibility Software engineer
seanmmur@cisco.com
Tel: +61 2 8446 7751      Cisco Systems, Inc.
The Forum 201 Pacific Highway
ST LEONARDS
2065
Australia
cisco.com          
 
 Think before you print.
This email may contain confidential and privileged material for the sole 
use of the intended recipient. Any review, use, distribution or disclosure 
by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient 
(or authorized to receive for the recipient), please contact the sender by 
reply email and delete all copies of this message.
 
 
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-- 
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chaals@yandex-team.ru - - - Find more at http://yandex.com
 



-- 
Sharron Rush | Executive Director | Knowbility.org | @knowbility
Equal access to technology for people with disabilities
Received on Tuesday, 8 November 2016 18:14:19 UTC

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