W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > October to December 2016

Re: courses for designers and developers.

From: Wayne Dick <waynedick@knowbility.org>
Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2016 08:44:41 -0800
Message-ID: <CAC9gL77A5GeB4p8ZC6ngQ2QWa18o14Vf3jwDWN1geNHcEjHFHQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: Sharron Rush <srush@knowbility.org>
Cc: WAI Interest Group <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
My university, Cal State Long Beach, still offers accessibility in our
majors and non-majors course.

Each course gives a week on WCAG 2.0 and then includes accessibility as a
part of grade evaluation. Generally an inaccessible can get at best a B.

Wayne Dick
Professor Emeritus
Computer Engineering and Computer Science
CSU, Long Beach


On Tue, Nov 8, 2016 at 7:54 AM, Sharron Rush <srush@knowbility.org> wrote:

> Greetings all,
>
> Yesterday, Nov 7th, the White House hosted their final Disability and
> Inclusive Technology Summit and live streamed the discussion. One of the
> panels was led by Larry Goldberg and featured two researchers who were
> working with the new TeachAccess initiative to encourage the integration of
> accessibility and inclusive design thinking in college curricula across
> disciplines to include designers, developers, programmers, engineers, human
> factors, psychology and more. Research and active programs were presented
> by Bruce Walker <http://www.cc.gatech.edu/people/bruce-walker> from
> Georgia Tech and Matt Huenerfauth <http://huenerfauth.ist.rit.edu/> from
> Rochester Institute of Technology.
>
> In my view there is nothing more important than this kind of integration
> into standard university courses across the board. TeachAccess is quite
> open and encourages participation from around the globe. You can learn more
> at http://teachaccess.org.
>
> Best,
> Sharron
>
>
>
> On Tue, Nov 8, 2016 at 8:43 AM, <chaals@yandex-team.ru> wrote:
>
>> - d.birkett@, aboyd@, ludovic.giambiasi@, seanmmur@, matthew.putland@
>>
>> Hi Alan,
>>
>> [Please note the W3C email attachment policy asks you not to attach Word
>> documents, for some fairly good reasons. But that's by the by…]
>>
>> This is an interesting read. As I am sure you are aware it needs a bit of
>> "copy-editing" to clean out the odd typo and unfinished sentence, and I
>> think it would do better if it had a short summary - the introduction reads
>> more like a cover letter.
>>
>> I like the approach of moving between stuff about accessibility as an
>> idea, rules, and technical standards. I think you would do well to shrink
>> the bits on individual sets of regulations and policies, and consider the
>> broad types of rules.
>> Roughly I think there are two common approaches.
>>
>> Many sets of rules that are based on meeting a specific set of required
>> checkpoints, such as having keyboard-operable controls or only using
>> language from a given set of common terms. This is similar to copying and
>> pasting from e.g. WCAG, then optionally editing a bit more to "suit local
>> conditions". Things like Section 508 fall into this category, as well as
>> checklists applied in organisations, or even a rule that says "meet WCAG X
>> to level so-and-so, plus checkpoints such-and-such".
>>
>> The other approach is typified by Australia's and the UK's law against
>> discriminating on the basis of disability. Essentially they say that it is
>> not lawful to offer a product or service that a person with a disability
>> cannot use by reason of their disability.
>>
>>
>> A noted advantage of the first kind is that it is easier to test whether
>> you have met the requirements, since they are clearly listed. A noted
>> advantage of the second is that as technology evolves there is in theory
>> nobody left behind while the requirements aren't updated to the new
>> reality. There are other interesting aspects - if you were offering this to
>> a law or behavioural economics class, you might consider the different
>> schemes for enforcement and dealing with breaches of the policy, and which
>> are more effective in actually reducing problems for people and in
>> motivating technological development.
>>
>> Anyway, I hope the University of Manitoba recognises the value of your
>> proposals, and sees how to incorporate accessibility education both as a
>> stand-alone subject and integrated as appropriate into their existing work.
>>
>> cheers
>>
>>
>> 08.11.2016, 13:36, "Alan Bridgeman" <a.bridgeman@hotmail.com>:
>>
>> Hello,
>>
>> I seem to be pretty late to this email chain and I'm meirly a fourth year
>> computer scoence undergrad at the University of Manitoba. But I wanted to
>> through my two cents in since I'm going to be trying to convince the
>> university I attend (University of Manitoba) and hopefully the Canadian
>> Information Processing Society (CIPS) which as I understand is the closest
>> thing to a computer science program regulatory body in Canada. To include
>> this kind of matterial in our computer scoence curriculim(s).
>>
>> Now I know the OCAD University Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC)
>> does education (Master degrees) on this type of stuff but I can't speak to
>> this other then to say I've heard good things. Here is their website:
>> http://idrc.ocadu.ca
>>
>> Below I've included a copy of a documrnt I've written as a rough first
>> draft proposal (thats been reviewed by a few people with decent standing)
>> specifically for the purpose of convincing the computer science departmemy
>> to include this kind of matterial in the University of Manitoba program. I
>> don't know if it will help with the specific issues at hand but feel free
>> to use it for your own ends or if you have time I'd really like the
>> feedback on it as well.
>>
>> Thanks for all your time.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Alan Bridgeman
>>
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Dean Birkett | AssistiveWare <d.birkett@assistiveware.com>
>> Date: 2016-11-08 5:44 AM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: "Boyd, Amanda (UK - Belfast)" <aboyd@deloitte.co.uk>
>> Cc: Ludovic GIAMBIASI <ludovic.giambiasi@gmail.com>, "Sean Murphy
>> (seanmmur)" <seanmmur@cisco.com>, Matthew Putland <
>> matthew.putland@mediaaccess.org.au>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>> Subject: Re: courses for designers and developers.
>>
>> I find a lot of the online Accessibility courses tend to be developer
>> focussed. The one Matthew mentioned is broader, and you don’t hit any code
>> at all. although I wouldn’t say it is for UXers either - it’s more of a
>> broad intro, and the coursework revolves around accessibility testing &
>> creating accessible content (videos).
>>
>> The free MOOC from The University of Southampton (
>> https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/digital-accessibility) is also quite
>> broad, and it introduces you to issues faced by people with various
>> impairments, but there are no real tests as such.
>>
>> To date I’ve yet to find a course that really covers Accessibility from a
>> UX perspective, which is a real shame, but I can totally recommend a
>> workshop with Derek Featherstone of Simply Accessible, he helped me (a UX
>> Designer with  a keen interest in Accessibility) to come at design problems
>> through an Accessibility lens to create better solutions.
>>
>> Best
>> Dean
>>
>>
>> On 8 Nov 2016, at 11:20, Boyd, Amanda (UK - Belfast) <
>> aboyd@deloitte.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> As a web developer – accessibility is a fundamental aspect of the web. If
>> we are teaching our students front-end web development – accessibility
>> should be core to this.
>>
>> It was covered alittle in my university course in UK, all our sites had
>> to be W3C accessibility checked althought I felt the aria labels and
>> voiceover accessibility could have been covered more.
>>
>> Teaching students to solve the accessibility problems they run into when
>> they are coding – for example – how the structure of their code regarding
>> H1-H6 and the layout of forms could impact the page navigation of the user
>> tabbing through while using Voiceover.
>>
>> If we teach them to adopt this while coding – they will adopt these
>> considerations into their projects/apps before starting.
>>
>> Everyone always leave accessibility to the end of projects as an after
>> thought :(
>>
>> Many Thanks,
>> *Amanda Boyd*
>>
>>
>> Please consider the environment before printing.
>>
>> *From: *Ludovic GIAMBIASI <ludovic.giambiasi@gmail.com>
>> *Date: *Tuesday, 8 November 2016 09:49
>> *To: *"Sean Murphy (seanmmur)" <seanmmur@cisco.com>, Matthew Putland <
>> matthew.putland@mediaaccess.org.au>, "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <
>> w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
>> *Subject: *Re: courses for designers and developers.
>> *Resent-From: *<w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
>> *Resent-Date: *Tuesday, 8 November 2016 09:50
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> In all my interventions (university, private school, etc.) I include
>> accessibility and UX courses. Sometimes, courses are dedicated to
>> accessibility, otherwise in all programming courses, I include
>> accessibility  part and ux also...
>>
>> I'm in France...
>>
>> Ludo,
>>
>> Le mar. 8 nov. 2016 à 07:40, Sean Murphy (seanmmur) <seanmmur@cisco.com>
>> a écrit :
>>
>> Matthew
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Thank you for the response. The information you have shared in relation
>> to the South Australian course I was aware of and should have mention it in
>> my original post. The info you shared in relation to the offerings from
>> your university appears to be the status quo for Australia.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> If UX and developers are not getting their teeth into this area of
>> development and design at an University level. Then it is a uphill battle
>> to change things without people repeating themselves over and over. Thus
>> why I raised the question.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sean Murphy
>>
>> Accessibility Software engineer
>>
>> seanmmur@cisco.com
>>
>> Tel: +61 2 8446 7751 <+61%202%208446%207751>      Cisco Systems, Inc.
>>
>> The Forum 201 Pacific Highway
>>
>> ST LEONARDS
>>
>> 2065
>>
>> Australia
>>
>> cisco.com
>>
>>
>>
>>  Think before you print.
>>
>> This email may contain confidential and privileged material for the sole
>> use of the intended recipient. Any review, use, distribution or disclosure
>> by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient (or
>> authorized to receive for the recipient), please contact the sender by
>> reply email and delete all copies of this message.
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* Matthew Putland [mailto:matthew.putland@mediaaccess.org.au]
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, 8 November 2016 4:57 PM
>> *To:* w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>> *Subject:* RE: courses for designers and developers.
>>
>>
>>
>> > I am wondering if Universities, Third party trainers and the like
>> cover accessibility in their development and UX courses? If so, is there
>> any resources for different countries to indicate which training
>> organisations that cover this in their courses and what level of quality
>> the training is?
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi Sean Murphy,
>>
>>
>>
>> >From my own experience and talking with others, Accessibility training
>> in web dev and UX courses are few and far between. My own I.T Degree which
>> I completed at the end of 2015 only discussed accessibility for 3 marks of
>> a single assignment, and that’s in my entire degree. My UX designer
>> colleague from the University of Sydney had a lecture on accessibility, but
>> of course 1 lecture isn’t enough to go to a very deep level.
>>
>>
>>
>> There is however an online 6-week University-level course that my
>> organization runs called the “Professional Certificate of Web
>> Accessibility
>> <http://www.unisa.edu.au/education-arts-and-social-sciences/communication-international-studies-and-languages/pcwa/>”
>> at the University of South Australia, which is completely self-promoting
>> but may assist with what you’re looking for.
>>
>>
>>
>> I’m unsure if there’s any collaboration between countries on what is
>> taught accessibility-wise, but I’d say there’s still a sad lack of
>> accessibility training in general for these courses.
>>
>>
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>>
>>
>> *Matthew Putland*
>>
>> Senior Analyst, Digital Accessibility | Media Access Australia
>>
>> 61 Kitchener Avenue, Victoria Park WA 6100
>>
>> Tel: 08 9311 8230 (direct) 02 9212 6242 <02%2092%2012%2062%2042> (main)
>> Mobile: 0431 924 288 Web: www.mediaaccess.org.au
>>
>>
>>
>> *My working hours are from 11am-7:30pm AEST (8am-4:30pm AWST).*
>>
>>
>>
>> Media Access Australia <http://www.mediaaccess.org.au/> - inclusion
>> through technology and Access iQ® <http://www.accessiq.org/> - creating
>> a web without limits. Follow us on Twitter @mediaaccessaus
>> <https://twitter.com/mediaaccessaus>@AccessiQ
>> <https://twitter.com/accessiq>
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* Sean Murphy (seanmmur) [mailto:seanmmur@cisco.com
>> <seanmmur@cisco.com>]
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, 8 November 2016 9:13 AM
>> *To:* w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>> *Subject:* courses for designers and developers.
>>
>>
>>
>> I am wondering if Universities, Third party trainers and the like cover
>> accessibility in their development and UX courses? If so, is there any
>> resources for different countries to indicate which training organisations
>> that cover this in their courses and what level of quality the training is?
>>
>> Sean Murphy
>>
>> Accessibility Software engineer
>>
>> seanmmur@cisco.com
>>
>> Tel: +61 2 8446 7751 <+61%202%208446%207751>      Cisco Systems, Inc.
>>
>> The Forum 201 Pacific Highway
>>
>> ST LEONARDS
>>
>> 2065
>>
>> Australia
>>
>> cisco.com
>>
>>
>>
>>  Think before you print.
>>
>> This email may contain confidential and privileged material for the sole
>> use of the intended recipient. Any review, use, distribution or disclosure
>> by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient (or
>> authorized to receive for the recipient), please contact the sender by
>> reply email and delete all copies of this message.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *IMPORTANT NOTICE*
>>
>> This communication is from Deloitte LLP, a limited liability partnership
>> registered in England and Wales with registered number OC303675. Its
>> registered office is 2, New Street Square, London EC4A 3BZ, United Kingdom.
>> Deloitte LLP is the United Kingdom member firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu
>> Limited (“DTTL”), a UK private company limited by guarantee, whose member
>> firms are legally separate and independent entities. Please see
>> www.deloitte.co.uk/about for a detailed description of the legal
>> structure of DTTL and its member firms.
>>
>> This communication contains information which is confidential and may
>> also be privileged. It is for the exclusive use of the intended
>> recipient(s). If you are not the intended recipient(s), please (1) notify
>>  it.security.uk@deloitte.co.uk by forwarding this email and delete all
>> copies from your system and (2) note that disclosure, distribution, copying
>> or use of this communication is strictly prohibited. Email communications
>> cannot be guaranteed to be secure or free from error or viruses. All emails
>> sent to or from a Deloitte UK email account are securely archived and
>> stored by an external supplier within the European Union.
>>
>>
>> To the extent permitted by law, Deloitte LLP does not accept any
>> liability for use of or reliance on the contents of this email by any
>> person save by the intended recipient(s) to the extent agreed in a Deloitte
>> LLP engagement contract.
>>
>> Opinions, conclusions and other information in this email which have not
>> been delivered by way of the business of Deloitte LLP are neither given nor
>> endorsed by it.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Charles McCathie Nevile - web standards - CTO Office, Yandex
>> chaals@yandex-team.ru - - - Find more at http://yandex.com
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Sharron Rush | Executive Director | Knowbility.org | @knowbility
> *Equal access to technology for people with disabilities*
>
Received on Tuesday, 8 November 2016 16:45:15 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 8 November 2016 16:45:16 UTC