W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-eo@w3.org > January to March 1999

Re: Web Accessibility browser testsuite???

From: Charles McCathieNevile <charles@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 17:12:55 -0500 (EST)
To: "Leonard R. Kasday" <kasday@acm.org>
cc: w3c-wai-eo@w3.org
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.04.9901271709100.26659-100000@tux.w3.org>
I would say that it satisfies the first priority of accessible - the
information is available. So I would say it is. Is it good? Aaah, that is
another question. I would ask some screenreader users that question - I
find it good, because I can do stuff like run it on a magnified screen.

Charles

On Wed, 27 Jan 1999, Leonard R. Kasday wrote:

  You're right!  Indeed, "IMAGEMAP" shows on the status line when you're on
  an imagemap link.  It's the same in lynx 2.7.1, which is what I have.
  However, I had to switch to "expert" mode.
  
  As to your rhetorical question about whether it's accessible to access
  technology.  I suppose it's strictly speaking "accessible" to access
  technology, in the sense that in principle you can hear it, but with an
  ordinary screen reader you'd have to set it to always speak the status
  line, which usually is just the URL which a user would not want to listen
  to all the time.  That's a real annoyance I would think.
  
  Hmmm. On the other hand, if you have a screen reader that alerts you when a
  particular region of the screen changes, you could set a little 1x1 window
  in the lower left hand corner and have it always spoken when it changed.
  Then as the user went from link to link nothing would be spoken--because it
  would remain "h"--till s/he reached an imagemap, at which point it would
  say "I".  Or if it hit mailto: in which case it would say "m".   
  
  The old DOS readers had something like that feature.  I don't know if that
  works in a lynx or telnet window in win98.  Experienced DOS screenreader
  users will know all this better than I.
  
  Anyway, thats better than having to listen to http blah blah  most of the
  time.
  
  So now I get to ask rhetorically: is it "accessible" when the user has to
  have that much special knowledge and make such a special setup?
  
  
Received on Wednesday, 27 January 1999 17:13:06 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.4.0 : Friday, 17 January 2020 20:29:27 UTC