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Re: URI Templates: done or dead?

From: Mark Nottingham <mnot@mnot.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2008 09:20:48 +1000
Cc: URI <uri@w3.org>, Joe Gregorio <joe@bitworking.org>, David Orchard <orchard@pacificspirit.com>, Marc Hadley <Marc.Hadley@Sun.COM>
Message-Id: <63AB4C7C-D4E9-4671-A252-EB3A935A118A@mnot.net>
To: John Cowan <cowan@ccil.org>

'required' is a bit strong; the relevant text in section 2.4 (below)  
at most implies that they can be treated as equivalent by  
implementations that choose to.

> When a URI is dereferenced, the components and subcomponents  
> significant to the scheme-specific dereferencing process (if any)  
> must be parsed and separated before the percent-encoded octets  
> within those components can be safely decoded, as otherwise the data  
> may be mistaken for component delimiters. The only exception is for  
> percent-encoded octets corresponding to characters in the unreserved  
> set, which can be decoded at any time. For example, the octet  
> corresponding to the tilde ("~") character is often encoded as "%7E"  
> by older URI processing implementations; the "%7E" can be replaced  
> by "~" without changing its interpretation.


On 17/09/2008, at 8:13 AM, John Cowan wrote:

> Mark Nottingham scripsit:
>
>> There are just too many cases where the 'escape everything but
>> unreserved' rule gets in the way; for example, if my template is
>> "http://example.com/user/ {email}", I'm going to have percent- 
>> encoded @
>> signs in my URIs whether  I like it or not -- even though they're not
>> required to be percent- encoded there.
>
> It doesn't matter much, though, because anyone who decodes the URI
> is required to treat %40 and @ synonymously in that position.
>
> -- 
> John Cowan
>        cowan@ccil.org
>                I am a member of a civilization. --David Brin


--
Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/
Received on Tuesday, 16 September 2008 23:21:28 UTC

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