Re: Transcribing non-ascii URLs [was: revised "generic syntax" internet draft]

Keld J|rn Simonsen (keld@dkuug.dk)
Mon, 14 Apr 1997 22:54:23 +0200


Message-Id: <199704142054.WAA07441@dkuug.dk>
From: keld@dkuug.dk (Keld J|rn Simonsen)
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 1997 22:54:23 +0200
In-Reply-To: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>
To: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>, Francois Yergeau <yergeau@alis.com>
Subject: Re: Transcribing non-ascii URLs [was: revised "generic syntax" internet draft]
Cc: uri@bunyip.com, bert@w3.org

Dan Connolly writes:

> On the one hand, it makes a lot of sense that if a user creates
> a file and gives it a hebrew or arabic or CJK name, and then exports
> the file via an HTTP server, that the Address: field in a web
> browser should show the hebrew or arabic or ... characters faithfully.
> 
> On the other hand, suppose that address is to be printed and put
> in an advertisement or a magazine article. Should it print the
> hebrew/arabic/CJK characters using those glyphs?
> Or should it print ASCII glyphs corresponding to the characters
> of the %xx encoding of the original characters?

To me there is no doubt: we need to just have the right characters
in there, not the %XX thing. URLs are now used routinely in 
advertisement and in radio and TV. Imagine a radio speaker reading
aloud the %XX sequence. ... simply does not fly.

Also this is in accordance with the URL being abstract characters
and not representing any encoding.

Regards
Keld