W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-xg-socialweb@w3.org > July 2009

Re: Death and Berevement

From: Tim Anglade <tim.anglade@af83.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 02:42:29 +0200
Cc: "public-xg-socialweb@w3.org" <public-xg-socialweb@w3.org>
Message-Id: <0838C64A-22A0-4E73-BB4A-44BADEA73C5E@af83.com>
To: Phil Archer <phil@philarcher.org>
Interesting (if slightly morbid) point.

The issue is of definite interest nonetheless, if only because of the  
varying industry practices on the subject.

Currently, I'm only aware of two major services who take this  
eventuality into account:
* Facebook urges you to “memorialize” the deceased's page [1].  
Apparently, if you can *prove* you're the next of kin, they'll let you  
delete the account [2];
* MySpace lets you delete it permanently [3].

Le 26 juil. 09 à 21:39, Phil Archer a écrit :

> What I can't work out is whether this is something that might be  
> part of a future standardisation track - or simply a commercial  
> opportunity for someone. In which case, why the heck am I sending  
> this to a public list?  ;-)

Another good call. Considering how Americans are signing up for id- 
theft protection and the like, I could see a smallish industry of e- 
undertakers cropping up. Something like a nominal or sub-$10 yearly  
fee in exchange for a prompt removal (or advantageous e-embalming) of  
your accounts.


Cheers,
Tim

[1] http://www.facebook.com/help/contact.php?show_form=deceased
[2] http://blog.searchenginewatch.com/090224-113022
[3] http://faq.myspace.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/369/kw/dead/r_id/100061

- - - - - - -
Tim Anglade | directeur, pôle « Turbulences » | af83
42, boulevard de Sébastopol | 75003 Paris | France
1436, Howard St | San Francisco | CA 94103 | USA
Tel : +33 1 42 72 33 32
Mob : +33 6 35 92 77 58
skype : tim_anglade
Web : www.af83.com

This email is:  [X] bloggable   [ ] ask first   [ ] private
Received on Monday, 27 July 2009 00:43:05 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.4.0 : Friday, 17 January 2020 19:39:08 UTC