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[whatwg] Canvas for web spectrometry

From: Michael Norton <norto@me.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2013 20:39:48 -0400
Message-id: <78CFA241-A27E-4634-B5AC-AFF57E0975EE@me.com>
To: whatwg@whatwg.org
Mention of web spectrometer working group (WSWG) below (last paragraph in thread with Kyle) if anyone is interested.

One use case would be bringing to browsers a supplement to users' History pages: a Progress page, for without one's adequate knowledge of history, how is there progress?  (May sound esoteric or existential but i am actually being very logical and enjoying it too :-)

Mike

Sent by the hope boat.

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Michael Norton <norto@me.com>
> Date: October 13, 2013, 1:25:45 AM EDT
> To: Kyle Huey <me@kylehuey.com>
> Cc: "whatwg@whatwg.org" <whatwg@whatwg.org>, Robert O'Callahan <robert@ocallahan.org>
> Subject: Re: [whatwg] Canvas in workers
> 
> 
> 
>> On Sun, Oct 13, 2013 at 12:50 PM, Michael Norton <norto@me.com> wrote:
>>> Thank you!  Read over the 1st link you provided,  interesting.  A worker then seems similar to a runtime process in an os environment - is it a derivation of RPC?
>> 
>> In a manner of speaking.  Workers are an abstraction allowing for parallel computing on the web without any shared mutable state or locking.  They communicate via message passing, which can be thought of as an asynchronous RPC mechanism.
> 
> Distributed computing rather than parallel, yes?
> 
> 
>>>  Also, "Delegation" [Section 9.1.2.5] sounds like that SETI screensaver project years ago, for example.  Is that an accurate description of that section's use?
>> 
>> I am not familiar with this project.
> 
> Here's a current state of it: http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/
> 
>> 
>>> As for <canvas>, in Firefox I don't think you need it if you utilize XUL which has similar elements essentially describing the same process(es), for example employing <hbox> and <vbox> with various calls to and fro <iFrame> and DOM elements via event listeners, etc.
>> 
>> This mailing list is for discussing standards track features for the web, so the capabilities of proprietary Mozilla features such as XUL have little relevance here, except perhaps as sources to draw inspiration from.
> 
> XUL is an XML programming language, components of which utilize same structural engineering in stride with HTML5, DOM and such.  It is open-source, please provide proprietary statement clarification.
> 
> As for standards track, I'm interested in utilizing <canvas> too for a new browser component wg (to establish a spec for a web spectrometer) to develop a means of providing a medium for conveying Uniform Data Codifications (distinct from specs as those are standards; UDC would be data codified via legal processes; eg. Data.gov data)
> 
>   For Firefox devs, tho, I would be curious to know how <canvas> can be distinguished from XUL element naming/grouping conventions.  <canvas> seems more agile as pix regions are not bound to rectangular dimensions.
> 
> -Mike
> 
>> - Kyle
Received on Friday, 18 October 2013 01:29:41 UTC

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