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Re: [xhr]

From: <chaals@yandex-team.ru>
Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 16:23:30 +0200
To: Anne van Kesteren <annevk@annevk.nl>, Robert Hanson <hansonr@stolaf.edu>
Cc: WebApps WG <public-webapps@w3.org>
Message-Id: <399431409667810@webcorp01h.yandex-team.ru>


02.09.2014, 10:55, "Anne van Kesteren" <annevk@annevk.nl>:
> On Tue, Sep 2, 2014 at 2:54 AM, Robert Hanson <hansonr@stolaf.edu> wrote:
>> šI respectively request that the wording of the warning
[...]
>> šWarning: Developers must not pass false for the async argument when the
>> šJavaScript global environment is a document environment as it has
>> šdetrimental effects to the end user's experience. User agents are strongly
>> šencouraged to warn about such usage in developer tools and may experiment
>> šwith throwing a "InvalidAccessError" exception when it occurs so the feature
>> šcan eventually be removed from the platform.
>>
>> [change]što
>>
>> šNote: Developers should not pass false for the async argument when the
>> šJavaScript global environment is a document environment as it has
>> šdetrimental effects to the end user's experience. Developers are advised
>> šthat passing false for the async argument may eventually be removed from the
>> šplatform.
>
> Sorry. As with showModalDialog() we would really like to make this
> feature disappear. I realize this makes some forms of code generation
> harder, but hopefully you can find a way around that in time.

Perhaps we should set some sense of expectation about *when* it won't work. Different parts of the Web move on different timelines.

It may be simple to remove it from modern browsers, but this will simply motivate organisations who depend on a system that uses synch XHR to stop updating until they can find a way around. Understanding a bit better what happens in user-land would be very helpful, because giving people really good reasons to opt out of auto-upgrade and stick with the past is a bad idea...

> Synchronous networking on the UI thread is a no-go.

It's certainly an anti-pattern, given the thread constraints we have. But so is pushing big chunks of the real world to use old systems - because if they stop upgrading for one important problem, we revive the IE6 problem.

While I doubt we'll get a genuine flag day, it should be feasible to get a sense of who suffers from the change, and when we can "break the web" without causing too much serious fallout.

(My 2 kopecks)

chaals
Received on Tuesday, 2 September 2014 14:24:00 UTC

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