W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-tracking@w3.org > March 2013

Re: ISSUE-10 First party definition, ISSUE-60, ACTION-?

From: Bjoern Hoehrmann <derhoermi@gmx.net>
Date: Thu, 07 Mar 2013 00:06:27 +0100
To: Rigo Wenning <rigo@w3.org>
Cc: public-tracking@w3.org
Message-ID: <7sdfj8h8n6c0rv2f7nigdpa6ljqbl7io71@hive.bjoern.hoehrmann.de>
* Rigo Wenning wrote:
>On Sunday 03 March 2013 02:48:47 Bjoern Hoehrmann wrote:
>> Clicking on a link on http://www.w3.org/ might take me to another page
>> but it's very unlikely that the click would take me to another
>> "party".
>
>On the homepage of www.w3.org alone there are:

There are over 140 links on the page and among your 19 it seems unclear
to me for a number of them whether they are actually another party, say

>http://docs.webplatform.org/wiki/
>http://www.w3devcampus.com/

These seem to be run by the W3C.

>http://twitter.com/W3C
>http://identi.ca/w3c

And some Working Group members would consider these to be run by the W3C
also. That leaves around 10%, and most of the links are in a small area
that renders off-screen when you first load the page. Anyway...

>Clicking on them takes you to another party. The Web 1.0 is all about 
>jumping from one party to the other and not really realizing it.... So 
>the Web is _very_ likely to take you to another party if you click.

Let's say you are right, but the widget is such that clicking will not
in fact take you to another party. Let's say a third party news widget
shows a tabbed interface with tabs "World" and "Germany" and links to
corresponding current news stories. "World" is the default and the user
clicks "Germany". A third party blog comment widget has expand/collapse
controls, and the user toggles one of those. A third party survey widget
with a "show results" tab and the user clicks that tab. A third party
search box that the user types in but then does not submit the query...

Do you think the third party operating the widget should be elevated to
first party status? I read the proposal as doing that because that's all
more interaction than "merely mouses over, closes, or mutes" even though
it does not meet the "reasonably conclude with high probability that the
user intends to communicate with" definition for what is a first party.
What if users learn that these kinds of interactions do not in fact take
them to another party (or more reasonably, have learned that long ago)?
-- 
Björn Höhrmann · mailto:bjoern@hoehrmann.de · http://bjoern.hoehrmann.de
Am Badedeich 7 · Telefon: +49(0)160/4415681 · http://www.bjoernsworld.de
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Received on Wednesday, 6 March 2013 23:06:54 UTC

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