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Re: how do I copy some properties that are part of a bigger pattern

From: Dan Scott <dan@coffeecode.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 10:56:00 -0400
Message-ID: <CAJcoVMjR3phm0_wUGDGB8_TYqK+BBcmxaGtCQKA=17R8Vmi7xA@mail.gmail.com>
To: Jarno van Driel <jarnovandriel@gmail.com>
Cc: Gregg Kellogg <gregg@greggkellogg.net>, Larry Betts <lbetts@thoughtwm.com>, "Dr. Richard H. McCullough" <rhm@pioneerca.com>, Niklas Lindström <lindstream@gmail.com>, public-rdfa <public-rdfa@w3.org>
Hi Jarno:

On Fri, Apr 18, 2014 at 10:39 AM, Jarno van Driel
<jarnovandriel@gmail.com>wrote:

<snip>

"Also, in both cases, you use #me..."
> #me is in there because I copied it from Niklas's example. To be honest I
> haven't got a clue yet as to when use # and when not, simply because I
> haven't looked into it yet. I already was dancing around the table to
> finally get this far. Because I'm finally starting to make sense of the
> similarities between Microdata and RDFa not only my Microdata markup is
> improving but have I also become interested again in trying to understand
> RDFa (finally). So for now I'm enjoying the moment, even though I know I'm
> not there yet. Much to learn still.
>

You (and others) might find my RDFa / schema.org tutorial at
http://stuff.coffeecode.net/2014/schema_org_codelab/ useful, as it
gradually walks through various scenarios introducing the addition of
schema.org via RDFa to a simple document, with a rationale at each step for
why you would want to use a particular construct.

It is by no means exhaustive, but I think it offers a useful intermediate
step between the RDFa Lite spec-as-tutorial at
http://www.w3.org/TR/rdfa-lite/ (which is wonderful but brief) and the RDFa
1.1 primer at http://www.w3.org/TR/rdfa-lite/ (which is also wonderful and
more in-depth). And as the codelab is oriented towards hands-on learning
and checking your efforts with various tools, it might appeal to a
different type of learner.

(Feedback welcome, naturally!)

Dan
Received on Friday, 18 April 2014 14:56:49 UTC

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