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[Bug 3414] [XqueryX] Location of schema and stylesheet

From: <bugzilla@wiggum.w3.org>
Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2006 09:26:30 +0000
CC:
To: public-qt-comments@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1FwFGg-0005Un-EH@wiggum.w3.org>

http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=3414

           Summary: [XqueryX] Location of schema and stylesheet
           Product: XPath / XQuery / XSLT
           Version: Candidate Recommendation
          Platform: PC
        OS/Version: Windows XP
            Status: NEW
          Severity: normal
          Priority: P2
         Component: XQueryX
        AssignedTo: jim.melton@acm.org
        ReportedBy: davidc@nag.co.uk
         QAContact: public-qt-comments@w3.org


This comment is prompted by bug #3333 but I was planning to make it anyway.

It would be very helpful if XQueryX spec refered to normative machine readable
files at some permanant URI not under http://www.w3.org/TR and then gave the
html rendition of those files that is currently in the spec as informative
helpful convenience rather than as the normative version.

W3C policy on TR space means (paraphrasing slightly) that once published it can
never be edited in place, only by errata. This is an excellent policy for
preserving the historical record of documents, but not so good for machine
readable files, as schema validators and xslt engines can't read errata
documents.

I'm sure that W3C would give you
http://www.w3.org/2006/XQueryX/xqueryx.xsd
or some such if requested, or you could use a URI under the XQuery group's
existing public area. In eiether case it has the advantage that any changes
required before or after the spec itself goes to REC can be made _in place_.

MathML 1.0 used to have its normative DTD as inline text in the document.
This was changed in MathML 1.1 and 2.0 to (also) have it as a machine readable
file in the same directory as the REC text.
this was changed by errata and incorporated in MathML 2.0 2nd edition to point
to a normative file out of TR space (in http://www.w3.org/Math/DTD).
Having been through the pain of that particular learning curve I'm keen to see
others avoid it:-)

David
Received on Friday, 30 June 2006 09:26:42 UTC

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