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Re: Is 303 really necessary - demo

From: Nathan <nathan@webr3.org>
Date: Fri, 05 Nov 2010 17:28:56 +0000
Message-ID: <4CD43ED8.60309@webr3.org>
To: Antoine Zimmermann <antoine.zimmermann@insa-lyon.fr>
CC: public-lod@w3.org
Antoine Zimmermann wrote:
> Le 05/11/2010 18:01, Nathan a écrit :
>> Antoine Zimmermann wrote:
>>> Le 05/11/2010 16:42, Nathan a écrit :
>>>> [skip]
>>>>
>>>> Sadly your proposed 210 still has it, the true problem isn't a status
>>>> code thing, it's an "if I can GET it, it's a document", hence the
>>>> earlier outlined problems with 303 as it stands, still the same 
>>>> problem.
>>>
>>> So, you are against hash URIs? Because if you can GET a hashless URI
>>> with 200 OK, then put a hash behind it and you can GET the resulting
>>> URI with a 200 OK too.
>>>
>>> According to httpRange-14, if the HTTP response code for a given URI
>>> is 2xx, then the URI denotes an information resource. Quote:
>>>
>>> """
>>> a) If an "http" resource responds to a GET request with a
>>> 2xx response, then the resource identified by that URI
>>> is an information resource;
>>> """
>>>
>>> GET http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine -> 200 OK -> it's a document!
>>>
>>> GET http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine#me -> 200 OK -> it's a
>>> document!
>>>
>>> GET http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine.rdf -> 200 OK -> it's a
>>> document!
>>>
>>> So your argument is moot since it is going against your own
>>> recommendation.
>>
>> Did you check the HTTP request? #frag isn't included, it's chopped off
>> before sending, those three requests resulted in the following 3 URIs
>> being requested:
>>
>> http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine
>> http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine
>> http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine.rdf
>>
>> no frags, un-mooted.
> 
> Ah yes, forgot this small detail :p.
> So obviously, a hash URI cannot resolve to 2xx since it cannot resolve 
> at all!  But, in the end, isn't it quite the same principle: I use a 
> distinct URI that eventually resolves to the same document?

It's the critical difference in all of this:

   http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine
   http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine.rdf

both "can be resolved"

   http://liris.cnrs.fr/~azimmerm/antoine#me

cannot be resolved

URI resolution is essentially:

   dereference( <uri>.toAbsolute() );

Which gives us the simplicity and semantic indirection which we need. 
Use frags, forget HTTP, know that <uri>#frag is never going to be a 
document (unless you explicitly "say" it is).

Best,

Nathan
Received on Friday, 5 November 2010 17:30:08 UTC

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