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Re: Codecs for <video> and <audio>

From: Sierk Bornemann <sierkb@gmx.de>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 01:30:39 +0200
Cc: Sam Ruby <rubys@us.ibm.com>, Ian Hickson <ian@hixie.ch>
Message-Id: <CD4EE9C5-395B-425B-A86A-BE66673DAFD6@gmx.de>
To: HTML WG <public-html@w3.org>
Knowing, that currently there has been a HTML WG survey about how to  
deal with the wording in the HTML 5 spec concerning the video codecs,  
especially OggTheora/OggVorbis (versus H.264), I want to ask, if Sun's  
attempt to offer a solution to that tricky problem via the royalty- 
free Open Media Commons (OMS) initiative under the leading role of Sun  
Microsystems is far out any discussion and far out any deeper  
investigation? Would it not be worth to draw closer attention to also  
that attempt, whose goal is to solve exactly that problem the HTML WG  
curls around since a long time? What about further and more backing  
and foster that initiative in what they are doing?

FYI:

OMS Video, A Project of Sun's Open Media Commons Initiative
http://blogs.sun.com/openmediacommons/entry/oms_video_a_project_of

Open Media Commons
http://www.openmediacommons.org/

Open Media Stack Video Specifications
http://www.openmediacommons.org/collateral/OMS-video-specs.html

Open Media Stack - Video Specification V0.91 (June 9, 2009), Updated  
video specification for OMS now available for community review
http://www.openmediacommons.org/collateral/OMS-video-v0.91.pdf

Crawling the archives of the HTML WG concerning <audio> and <video>, I  
haven't found any closer discussion, that nearer considers this OMS  
attempt as a possible solution.
My question is: why? Or better: why not?
Why only focus on Ogg Theora|Vorbis versus H.264? What is the point,  
that disqualifies OMS from being further discussed (or better:  
discussed at all) as a viable royalty-free alternative to the two well- 
known but disputed favorites?


Regards,
Sierk
-- 
Sierk Bornemann
http://sierkbornemann.de/
Received on Tuesday, 28 July 2009 23:31:21 UTC

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