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Re: New Terminology Section

From: Irene Polikoff <irene@topquadrant.com>
Date: Tue, 10 May 2016 19:45:21 -0400
To: Martynas Jusevičius <martynas@graphity.org>, Holger Knublauch <holger@topquadrant.com>
CC: RDF Data Shapes Working Group <public-data-shapes-wg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <D357E91A.9EBB4%irene@topquadrant.com>
Isn't this the same for OWL restrictions? If, for example, members of
class People have to have two values for parent property, this is true for
any subclass of People.

Irene 






On 5/10/16, 7:34 PM, "Martynas Jusevičius" <martynas@graphity.org> wrote:

>Except that in OO inheritance usually also means "IF superclass has
>property P but subclass does not have property P THEN subclass gets
>property P".
>
>Maybe the OO "inheritance" conflates several terms.
>
>On Wed, May 11, 2016 at 1:15 AM, Holger Knublauch
><holger@topquadrant.com> wrote:
>> On 11/05/2016 4:28, Karen Coyle wrote:
>>>
>>> My gut feeling is that we are wavering between a standard, which can be
>>> realized in any number of applications with varying additional
>>> functionality, and the description of an actual application. We need to
>>> tease those apart. (Quickly, I might add.)
>>
>>
>> Would you mind elaborating this a bit more?
>>
>> The basic concept of OO inheritance is that "IF X is an instance of a
>> subclass THEN X is also an instance of the superclass". This works the
>>same
>> way in OO as in RDFS/OWL, see
>>
>>     https://www.w3.org/TR/owl2-profiles/#cax-sco
>>
>> Whether type triples can also be inferred from the presence of certain
>> properties is not relevant to SHACL.
>>
>> Holger
>>
>>
>
Received on Tuesday, 10 May 2016 23:45:59 UTC

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