W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-credentials@w3.org > September 2017

Re: Claims and Multisource Journalistic Resources

From: Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 6 Sep 2017 04:55:02 +0000
To: "public-credentials@w3.org" <public-credentials@w3.org>, "public-vc-wg@w3.org" <public-vc-wg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <DM5PR01MB3275B2A248C132EA1D3C69A0C5970@DM5PR01MB3275.prod.exchangelabs.com>
For those interested in decentralized solutions, here are some hyperlinks on DOI:

https://doi.org<https://doi.org/>
https://www.crossref.org<https://www.crossref.org/>
https://www.doi.org/factsheets/DOIProxy.html#rest-api

https://github.com/CrossRef/rest-api-doc


A DOI URI for a factual claim occurring in a journalism article could resemble:
https://facts.press.org/fact/12345678

or
https://facts.press.org/fact/did:example:12345678


I envision that journalists can provide a link to a published news article and/or fill out a form to create or to update one or more DOI URI. There may be a REST API as well (1.b.i, 1.b.ii).

When a news article URL is shared on social media, the entity shared is a specific news article; when a DOI URI is shared, the entity shared is a factual claim (see also: http://verrit.com<http://verrit.com/>). The DOI service (e.g. https://facts.press.org/fact/12345678) responds with HTML with OpenGraph for social media crawlers (4.a).

When a DOI URI is navigated to by a human using a Web browser, including when they click on a shared factual claim, there are a number of design options and we can make use of use all of them as a DOI service can return different content for different query strings and HTTP parameters.

One option is to present a machine-generated webpage about the claim (2.a, 2.b, 2.c, 3.a, 4.a). Each such page includes all of the hyperlinks to news articles corroborating the factual claim. Each page includes a discussion area (5.a, 5.b). Each page includes hyperlinks to fact-checking organizations’ discussions of the factual claim.


Best regards,
Adam

From: Adam Sobieski<mailto:adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
Sent: ‎Tuesday‎, ‎September‎ ‎5‎, ‎2017 ‎4‎:‎55‎ ‎PM
To: public-credentials@w3.org<mailto:public-credentials@w3.org>

For those interested in decentralized solutions (the nodes of a decentralized resource could reside at journalism organizations), a DOI service could provide canonical URI’s (1.a) for claims hosted at multiple nodes. Such a DOI service could provide content for social media crawlers. Such a DOI service could accept HTTP and query string parameters and such a DOI service could provide content for different content types requested.

One way that verifiable claims can be of use is that news organizations can provide a URL to a verifiable claim for each factual claim. That is, the schema.org schema for a factual claim (2.b) could include a verification URL, a URL to a verifiable claim. We can consider scenarios for verifiable claims in HTML (<script type=”application/ld+json”…>…</script>) as well. The factual claim data becomes portable and verifiable.


Best regards,
Adam

P.S.: https://www.w3.org/community/collaboration/2015/12/09/e-participation-decision-support-systems-multi-document-natural-language-processing-and-cognitive-bias-mitigation/

From: Adam Sobieski<mailto:adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
Sent: ‎Tuesday‎, ‎September‎ ‎5‎, ‎2017 ‎11‎:‎37‎ ‎AM
To: public-credentials@w3.org<mailto:public-credentials@w3.org>

Credentials Community Group,

I would like to broach some topics pertaining to multisource (multiple journalists and journalism organizations using) claims-based resources. Here is an outline of ideas. I welcome your comments and ideas.


  1.
uploading to or producing claims on websites or decentralized resources
     *
each claim has or is at a URI
     *
each journalist with an account can create a claim
        *
API for document authoring plugins (Word, LibreOffice)
        *
API for Wordpress and Drupal (etc.) plugins
     *
claims in news articles, footnote hyperlinks to website or decentralized resource
  2.
presenting claims on websites or decentralized resources (e.g. https://verrit.com<https://verrit.com/>)
     *
claims as HTML (human-readable content at URI)
     *
claims as schema.org<http://schema.org/> schema
     *
claims as PNG (generating PNG for sharing)
  3.
multisource websites or decentralized resources
     *
provenance
        *
attribution/recognition of journalist and journalistic organization which first made the claim at the human-readable HTML content at URI
     *
URI-based attribution/recognition of journalist or journalistic organizations?
        *
https://resource.org/nytimes/2017/09/05/here-is-the-claim/

     *
HTTP forwarding in the event of a claim merge (two claims are the same)
        *
merge to the first-occurring claim
  4.
shareable claims
     *
claims and OpenGraph (http://ogp.me/)
  5.
discussing claims
     *
discussion area for each claim (e.g. https://verrit.com<https://verrit.com/>)
     *
discussion actions as per some resource policy? (e.g. https://www.wikipedia.org<https://www.wikipedia.org/>)
        *
types of user accounts?
  6.
searching for claims
     *
searching for identical claims
     *
searching for similar but different claims
     *
user searching for existing claims based on natural language queries
  7.  collecting together and visualizing claims in threads or narratives
     *
story / calendar / timeline view (e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_Russian_interference_in_the_2016_United_States_elections).
  8.
exporting all claims and collections of claims to machine-utilizable formats


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski

Received on Wednesday, 6 September 2017 04:55:37 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.4.0 : Friday, 17 January 2020 19:18:13 UTC