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Re: Knowledge representation and Disease Control frameworks using AI, KRIDs

From: carl mattocks <carlmattocks@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2020 08:20:38 -0400
Message-ID: <CAHtonumdOG4tee-3mnUMNEAAK5A-OxZ=Q7qQ_i1z9-1YZoLPiA@mail.gmail.com>
To: W3C AIKR CG <public-aikr@w3.org>
Milton

Thanks for affirming :
So in a strict sense of formalized representation for protocols you could
say that declarative and imperative (procedural)  knowledge would cover
protocols.

To help us consider how best to approach the use-case - please share the
section of the diagram focused on PROTOCOL

thanks
Carl
It was a pleasure to clarify


On Tue, May 26, 2020 at 1:08 AM ProjectParadigm-ICT-Program <
metadataportals@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Carl,
>
> I took the liberty of checking the types of knowledge in philosophy, and
> found a very useful page that covers 14 types of knowledge.
>
> See:
> 14 Types of Knowledge (Updated 2020) | Helpful Professor
> <https://helpfulprofessor.com/types-of-knowledge/>
>
> 14 Types of Knowledge (Updated 2020) | Helpful Professor
>
> Knowledge is "stored facts". All humans are capable of the storage of
> facts or information for retrieval at a la...
> <https://helpfulprofessor.com/types-of-knowledge/>
> It will take (3) dispersed knowledge, (4) domain or expert knowledge, (5)
> empirical knowledge, (6) encoded knowledge, (10) imperative knowledge and
> (11) descriptive knowledge to cover all processes in the three generalized
> types of processes.
>
> Types (3) and (5) lead to (4) which leads to (6) and (11).
>
> So in a strict sense of formalized representation for protocols you could
> say that declarative and imperative (procedural)  knowledge would cover
> protocols.
>
> but the framework also covers processes that do not involve protocols.
>
> I am working on a diagram to make this explicit for the entirety of the
> disease control framework.
>
> regards
>
> Milton Ponson
> GSM: +297 747 8280
> PO Box 1154, Oranjestad
> Aruba, Dutch Caribbean
> Project Paradigm: Bringing the ICT tools for sustainable development to
> all stakeholders worldwide through collaborative research on applied
> mathematics, advanced modeling, software and standards development
>
>
> On Monday, May 25, 2020, 7:49:28 PM ADT, carl mattocks <
> carlmattocks@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> Milton
>
> Thanks for sharing the insights gained from your ambitious plan - and the
> use-case 'for StratML utilized in AI, the KRID can be defined in unique
> Categories'.
> To help add more detail - do you consider that (all rules/syntax/workflow/
> etc) defined as  'Protocol' can be made explicit with Declarative and/or
> Imperative Knowledge?
>
> cheers
> Carl
>
>
> It was a pleasure to clarify
>
>
> On Mon, May 25, 2020 at 4:47 PM ProjectParadigm-ICT-Program <
> metadataportals@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> As I indicated earlier I have embarked on the rather ambitious plan of
> writing an article, titled "A Smart City Framework for Disease Control
> Utilizing Sensor, Tracing, Tracking, Wearable and Medical Technologies".
>
> There are a couple of important factors to take into account. First and
> foremost real-time spatio-temporal modeling in a smart city setting, this
> closely mirrors cellular structures found in wireless networking. Second,
> there is the modeling of processes. This is done by defining all related
> systems for disease control as a "set of systems of complex adaptive
> systems". Now some of these are very similar yet in terms of data and
> information required slightly variable. Then there is the inevitable
> problem of reliability of data, and verification thereof. And finally how
> to structure the data to allow manipulation thereof, and how to model all
> of this mathematically.
>
> What is striking in all of this, is regardless of the complexity of this
> set of systems of complex adaptive systems, three things stand out. (1) the
> use of protocols which can be made explicit by flowchart diagram
> algorithms, (2) protocols can be made explicit in a strategic planning
> context and thus converted to (eGovernment) machine readable format, (3)
> the exchange of data and information between the myriad of components in
> the disease control system is driven by categories of protocols defined by
> generalized chain-linked processes with specific required outcomes.
>
> As I also indicated in a prior post, the groundbreaking book published by
> Oxford University Press, Introduction to the Theory of Complex Systems by
> Stefan Thurner, Rudolf Hanel and Peter Klimek, "the kaleidoscope of complex
> systems are best described by the rules that govern their interactions".
>
> The framework thus boils down to three generalized processes: (1)
> Prevention, (2) Mitigation, (3) Creation of Viral Loss-of-funtion.
>
> Using category theory to generalize interaction rules, cellular
> spatio-temporal modeling, equivalence of protocols, flowchart diagrams and
> programs, and chain-linking protocols using strategic planning for desired
> inputs and outcomes makes it possible to make sense of required data and
> desired information outcomes necessary at each stage of a process chain
> link.
>
> This makes a case for StratML utilized in AI, the KRID can be defined in
> unique Categories.
>
> So what I am getting at is that we are able to uniquely define knowledge
> representation NOT by the objects in play by the rules that govern their
> interactions which specify desired outcomes, be it in simple systems or in
> complex adaptive systems context
>
> And for this category theory is indispensable.
>
> Thus our efforts in AIKR StratML strategies are very worthwhile pursuing.
>
> regards
>
> Milton Ponson
> GSM: +297 747 8280
> PO Box 1154, Oranjestad
> Aruba, Dutch Caribbean
> Project Paradigm: Bringing the ICT tools for sustainable development to
> all stakeholders worldwide through collaborative research on applied
> mathematics, advanced modeling, software and standards development
>
>
Received on Tuesday, 26 May 2020 12:21:28 UTC

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