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Re: proposed re-wording of Ian's 2.7

From: Ian Jacobs <ij@w3.org>
Date: Sun, 23 Jul 2000 13:26:00 -0400
Message-ID: <397B2AA8.5DB34FC8@w3.org>
To: Kitch Barnicle <barnicle@trace.wisc.edu>
CC: w3c-wai-ua@w3.org
Kitch Barnicle wrote:
> 
> Pending a new proposal from Charles, I've proposed new wording for
> checkpoint 2.7 below as per my action item from yesterday's call.

Hi Kitch,

My problem with your wording is the word "notification". I don't
think that notification (i.e., a  prompt) is required.  See my
other comments below.

> <Kitch's Modified>
>    2.7 For content in a recognized but unsupported natural
>          language, prevent user disorientation by allowing
>         the user agent to be configured so that notification
>         is provided when unrecognized content is rendered.
>          The user agent may choose to not render this content, but must
>         indicate the absence through the user interface.
>      Note: For example, if the user agent does not support
>        Japanese, render "[Japanese text]" instead of the content,
>        or use an accessible icon that indicates an unsupported language.
> </Kitch's Modified>

So here's an attempt to capture the requirements of the checkpoint:

Rationale: Prevent disorientation caused by rendering "garbage"
           for unsupposed natural languages. Is there other rationale
           that would affect the requirements?

Context: This applies to natural languages that are recognized by the UA
         but unsupposed (e.g., the UA doesn't have a font family
available
         to render the characters.

Two requirements:
  1) Don't do anything special when rendering.

OR

  2a) Either don't render the content and indicate to the user through
     the user interface that rendering has been suppressed. Note: I
don't
     think that this information is available through the DOM since the
     content is in the document object. 

     Issue: What is the minimal requirement for rendering the
indication?
     It has to be accessible. Does it need to be inline? What if there
     are 30 chunks of text in different unrecognized languages?

  2b) Or render with some indication that the content has not been
      adequately rendered due to missing resources or unsupported
languages.
   
     Issue: What is the minimal requirement for rendering the
indication?
     It has to be accessible. Does it need to be inline? What if there
     are 30 chunks of text in different unrecognized languages?

 Note: A graphical browser may not support a given natural language due
to
 lack of font resources, but an assistive technology might support that
 language.

Here's a proposal.

<NEW>
    2.7 For content in a recognized but unsupported natural
        language, prevent user disorientation by indicating
        (when configured to do so) the lack of support for the
        natural language. Any non-text indication must have a
        text equivalent that is available to assistive 
        technologies (refer to checkpoint 1.5). The user agent
        may suppress rendering of content in an unsupported
        natural language, but in this case must indicate
        the absence of the original content in context (e.g.,
        with an icon, analogous to the common "missing image"
        icon).
              Note: For example, if the user agent does not have a font
              available to render Japanese, render "[Japanese text]" 
              (in an appropriate natural language) instead.
              Or use an accessible icon that indicates an unsupported 
              language.
</NEW>

 - Ian

-- 
Ian Jacobs (jacobs@w3.org)   http://www.w3.org/People/Jacobs
Tel:                         +1 831 457-2842
Cell:                        +1 917 450-8783
Received on Sunday, 23 July 2000 13:26:05 GMT

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