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RE: Accesskey consensus

From: John Foliot - bytown internet <foliot@bytowninternet.com>
Date: Tue, 27 May 2003 11:39:49 -0400
To: "Tomas Caspers" <tomas@tomascaspers.de>, <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <GKEFJJEKDDIMBHJOGLENGEEIDLAA.foliot@bytowninternet.com>

After conducting an unofficial survey/research project in the summer of
2002, I concluded that there really were no useful access keys not already
reserved by some application or other.  When you take internationalisation
issues into account, it becomes a hopeless cause.

See: http://www.wats.ca/resources/accesskeys/19 for an opinion piece I wrote
regarding the subject.

JF





> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org]On
> Behalf Of Tomas Caspers
> Sent: Saturday, May 24, 2003 5:57 AM
> To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
> Subject: Re: Accesskey consensus
>
>
>
> Hoffman, Geoffrey wrote:
>
> > I added some of my own research to the above blog...
> > couldn't find a list of 'reserved access keys' so I created one.
>
>
>
> German accessibility evangelist Jan Hellbusch has a short list of
> accesskeys used by various browsers at:
> http://www.barrierefreies-webdesign.de/knowhow/tastatur/empfehlung.htm
>
> His findings were that the only characters which weren't used in the
> most common browsers  were c, j and t. Note that he only covers Win98,
> so the list of "free" keys might even get shorter when you start looking
> at other OS's and UA's.
>
> HTH
>
> /Tomas Caspers
>
> --
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Received on Tuesday, 27 May 2003 11:40:22 GMT

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