W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-webed@w3.org > March 2012

Re: Positioning document for web ed learning material

From: Lars Gunther <gunther@keryx.se>
Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2012 12:13:24 +0100
Message-ID: <4F55F154.2000106@keryx.se>
To: public-webed@w3.org
Just a quick, OTOH.

While new technologies are being developed for the web at a faster pace 
then ever, we have a really solid core of HTML and CSS.

The foundations have been set in stone and we can now guarantee that 
they will not change over the next decade. That we could not promise 10 
years ago.

E.g. there is precious little in this article

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/HTML/Intro

that I would suspect needs to be re-written 10 years from now.

Thus it's a matter of knowing what *kind* of information one is presenting.



2012-03-05 23:10, Chris Mills skrev:
> Thanks all for such great feedback. I'll get my teeth into this tomorrow
> and make some updates.
>
> Chris Mills
> Open standards evangelist and dev.opera.com <http://dev.opera.com>
> editor, Opera Software
> Co-chair, web education community group, W3C
>
> * Try Opera: http://www.opera.com
> * Learn about the latest open standards technologies and techniques:
> http://dev.opera.com
> * Contribute to web education: http://www.w3.org/community/webed/
>
> On 5 Mar 2012, at 22:05, Adrian Roselli wrote:
>
>> “Freshness dating.” Kind of like milk. Or cheese (the kind of cheese
>> that you don’t want to let age).
>> I like that. If it’s prominent, and doesn’t appear bloggy, then I
>> think that can at least qualify all the content throughout whatever we
>> build. As a surfer, I always check for a date on anything that might
>> change over time (news, specifications, product availability, cat
>> pictures), so these feeds into my expectations well.
>> *From:*Åke Järvklo [mailto:ake@jarvklo.se]
>> *Sent:*Monday, March 05, 2012 5:01 PM
>> *To:*Adrian Roselli
>> *Cc:*Chris Mills; W3C WebEd Public
>> *Subject:*Re: Positioning document for web ed learning material
>>
>> Hmm...
>>
>> IMHO The "keeping current"-problem will over time probably not only
>> apply to external examples and links - it will most likely become
>> equally relevant for our own excersises, our original content (and our
>> translations) sooner or later...
>>
>> So - perhaps having procedures in place for (very visibly) assuring
>> visitors that *we* keep our material current would also be a good thing...
>>
>> Imagine a "quality assurance stamp" on all published material stating
>> "reviewed and updated at {date}" - or "this is a translation, the
>> original text was revised {date} and the translation was updated to
>> reflect that at {date}"
>>
>> ... or something similar (eg. "this is the translation of version 17
>> of the FED-100 excersise7.1.2Assignment 1: Class Homepage")
>>
>> With that in place - wouldn't revising external examples while we
>> regurarily revise the material itself anyway be greatly simplified as
>> well?
>>
>> ... just a thought :)
>> /Åke J
>>
>> 2012/3/3 Adrian Roselli <Roselli@algonquinstudios.com
>> <mailto:Roselli@algonquinstudios.com>>
>> *Any* thoughts?
>>
>> When I interact with professors they (nearly) always ask about how to
>> stay current. Many don't know what resources to visit for current
>> trends and to see how things are evolving. I suspect we all know how
>> radically different many web dev aspects can be in any 6 month window.
>>
>> You may have considered this in your "reading lists" bullet, but I am
>> wary of the can of worms recommending specific blogs/sites can open.
>> I, for one, rail against any reference to W3 Schools. While I used to
>> recommendevolt.org <http://evolt.org>, I think we all know its time
>> has passed.
>>
>> Is it too early to identify a set of parameters for suggesting
>> ongoing, day-to-day online resources?
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my tablet and probably full of typos as a result.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Mar 2, 2012, at 1:04 PM, "Chris Mills" <cmills@opera.com
>> <mailto:cmills@opera.com>> wrote:
>>
>> > Some thoughts I have put together over the course of today, detailing
>> how our learning material might fit in with educators and students
>> involved in web ed courses, and next things I am going to do.
>> >
>> >http://www.w3.org/community/webed/wiki/Positioning_document_for_web_ed_learning_material
>> >
>> > any thoughts appreciated
>> >
>> > Chris Mills
>> > Open standards evangelist anddev.opera.com
>> <http://dev.opera.com>editor, Opera Software
>> > Co-chair, web education community group, W3C
>> >
>> > * Try Opera:http://www.opera.com
>> > * Learn about the latest open standards technologies and
>> techniques:http://dev.opera.com
>> > * Contribute to web education:http://www.w3.org/community/webed/
>> >
>> >
>>
>


-- 
Lars Gunther
http://keryx.se/
http://twitter.com/itpastorn/
http://itpastorn.blogspot.com/
Received on Tuesday, 6 March 2012 11:13:59 GMT

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