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Re: legacy of incompetence? [was: a compromise to the versioning debate]

From: Dão Gottwald <dao@design-noir.de>
Date: Tue, 17 Apr 2007 19:18:48 +0200
Message-ID: <46250178.4000603@design-noir.de>
To: Alfonso Martínez de Lizarrondo <amla70@gmail.com>
CC: Henk-Jan de Boer <html-wg@hjdeboer.nl>, Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>, "Preston L. Bannister" <preston@bannister.us>, "Dailey, David P." <david.dailey@sru.edu>, Alexander Graf <a.graf@aetherworld.org>, public-html@w3.org

Alfonso Martínez de Lizarrondo schrieb:
> 2007/4/17, Dão Gottwald <dao@design-noir.de>:
>>
>> Now I fear that MS actually wants more switches
>> because their initial implementation for the new HTML5 rendering mode
>> (that includes CSS and DOM at least) could be screwed up again. I don't
>> think that's acceptable.
>>
> 
> The problem that MS has is that all the current deployed pages that
> are in Strict mode are indeed relying on IE bugs, sometimes people
> have fixed with Conditional comments, some CSS selector hack, or any
> other kind of browser detection and so the users get the page to work
> as it was designed, and it's based on the current IE bugs.
> 
> If they just fix those bugs, it's clear that those pages will break.
> Probably the fix would be as easy as to remove the browser detection
> and serve all the browsers the same pages, but there are just too many
> pages out there and too many people that didn't know anything about
> Quirks vs Standard, they just did put the DOCTYPE to validate the page
> and then moved along.

That's why I expect them to switch on <!DOCTYPE html>. However, that 
doesn't justify other switches, a fortiori in the context of a HTML spec.

> Thinking that MS can fix all the current bugs in IE in just one
> release is really naive.

Chris Wilson wrote, "Microsoft's problem is not what Trident can 
support." So all it needs is 1) the decision to actually do it and 2) 
time. Others did that before.

> They could fix the major ones, but I still
> don't know of any browser that is error free in any single technology,
> so the next IE will have bugs, they can be in JS, DOM, CSS or
> whatever, but there will be bugs that will be fixed later (hopefully).

Yet no other browser needs a further switch, because the bug amount is 
reasonable and authors expect the vendors to fix bugs. To get into the 
same position, Microsoft has to release something that gets /close/ to 
the standards and do frequent releases afterwards.

--Dao
Received on Tuesday, 17 April 2007 17:19:26 UTC

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