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Re: public suffix list: when opacity meets security [metaDataInURI-31 siteData-36]

From: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2008 11:55:05 -0500
To: noah_mendelsohn@us.ibm.com
Cc: www-tag <www-tag@w3.org>
Message-Id: <1217436905.6785.340.camel@pav.lan>

On Wed, 2008-07-30 at 11:04 -0400, noah_mendelsohn@us.ibm.com wrote:
> My gut feel is that this might better be done by retrieval of hypermedia 
> documents as opposed to through maintenance of a centralized list.

I think that's what ´╗┐Nordstrom argued, though the structure
he suggested doesn't have anything to do with suffixes;
it has to do with trust relationships.

>    For 
> example, what if HTTP GET from http://uk (are retrievals from top level 
> domains supported?) returned a document with a list of public suffixes 
> such as "co.uk"?  You could, I suppose, also establish some standard 
> subdomain so instead of retrieving from "uk" you'd retrieve from 
> http://domain_description.uk.  Browsers could then use recursive 
> retrievals to build up pertinent parts of the public domain table locally. 
>  Seems much more scalable and appropriately distributed than a centralized 
> list.  Am I missing something obvious?
> 
> Noah
> 
> --------------------------------------
> Noah Mendelsohn 
> IBM Corporation
> One Rogers Street
> Cambridge, MA 02142
> 1-617-693-4036
> --------------------------------------
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>
> Sent by: www-tag-request@w3.org
> 06/19/2008 12:01 PM
>  
>         To:     www-tag <www-tag@w3.org>
>         cc: 
>         Subject:        public suffix list: when opacity meets security 
> [metaDataInURI-31       siteData-36]
> 
> 
> 
> I wonder how the principle of opacity applies in this case...
> http://www.w3.org/TR/webarch/#pr-uri-opacity
> 
> The proposal is:
> 
> [[
> The Mozilla Project (http://www.mozilla.org/), responsible for the
> Firefox web browser, requests your help.
> 
> We are maintaining a list of all "Public Suffixes". A Public Suffix is a
> domain label under which internet users can directly register domains.
> Examples of Public Suffixes are ".net", ".org.uk" and ".pvt.k12.ca.us".
> In other words, the list is an encoding of the "structure" of each
> top-level domain, so a TLD may contain many Public Suffixes. This
> information is used by web browsers for several purposes - for example,
> to make sure they have secure cookie-setting policies. For more details,
> see http://publicsuffix.org/learn/.
> ]]
>  -- Gervase Markham (Monday, 9 June)
>   http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/ietf-http-wg/2008AprJun/0483.html
> 
> arguments against include:
> 
> [[
> By proper design you can easily make cross-site cookies be
> verifiable. Set out the goal that a site must indicate that cross-site
> cookies is allowed for it to be accepted, and then work from there.
> There is many paths how to get there, and the more delegated you make it
> close to the owners and operators of the sites the better.
> 
> The big question is what that design should look like, but it's
> certainly not a central repository with copies hardcoded into software.
> ]]
>  -- Henrik Nordstrom  10 Jun 2008
>   http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/ietf-http-wg/2008AprJun/0552.html
> 
> 
> tracker: ISSUE-31, ISSUE-36
> 
-- 
Dan Connolly, W3C http://www.w3.org/People/Connolly/
gpg D3C2 887B 0F92 6005 C541  0875 0F91 96DE 6E52 C29E
Received on Wednesday, 30 July 2008 16:54:42 UTC

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