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Re: Information resources

From: Tim Berners-Lee <timbl@w3.org>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2003 15:40:27 -0400
Cc: Tim Bray <tbray@textuality.com>, WWW-Tag <www-tag@w3.org>
To: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>
Message-Id: <D63B782E-C38E-11D7-AB0E-000393914268@w3.org>

> Again, that's not what I suggested. For the *3rd* time,
> the text I'm suggesting is:
>
>   When Dan found http://weather.example.com/oaxaca in the magazine,
>   he inferred that it was *on the Web*; that is, it has a 
> representation
>   available, barring network failures, access policies, and such.
>   While URIs can, in general, be used to refer to any sort of
>   resource, the case of an *information resource*, that is, one
>   for which Web protocols provide representations, is particularly
>   relevant to the structure of the Web: a *link* is the use of a URI
>   in the representation of an information resource refer to
>   another resource. The large-scale effect of the use of these links
>   is a shared information space. The value of the Web
>   grows exponentially as a function of the number of linked
>   resources (the "network effect").

Could we tweak the middle of that, to avoid the apparent dependency
on the net being up, and include TimBray's definition?:

> When Dan found http://weather.example.com/oaxaca in the magazine,
>   he inferred that it was *on the Web*; that is, it has a 
> representation
>   available, barring network failures, access policies, and such.
   While URIs can, in general, be used to refer to any sort of
   resource, the case of an *information resource*, a resource
   which is information, is particularly
   relevant to the structure of the Web.  Of these the Web protocols
   can provide "representations": expressions in some data format,
   with accompanying metadata.
>   A *link* is the use of a URI
>   in the representation of an information resource refer to
>   another resource. The large-scale effect of the use of these links
>   is a shared information space. The value of the Web
>   grows exponentially as a function of the number of linked
>   resources (the "network effect").

timbl
Received on Thursday, 31 July 2003 15:40:30 UTC

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