W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > April 2015

Re: Font MIME types

From: David Kuettel <kuettel@google.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2015 11:18:12 -0700
Message-ID: <CAAYUqgG0bvhXBrVFiVCEZRjxpNMZENBEtcP6SKGxTTgg_g-P0A@mail.gmail.com>
To: John Hudson <john@tiro.ca>
Cc: Anne van Kesteren <annevk@annevk.nl>, "www-style@w3.org" <www-style@w3.org>, "Levantovsky, Vladimir" <Vladimir.Levantovsky@monotypeimaging.com>
On Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 10:55 AM, John Hudson <john@tiro.ca> wrote:

> On 03/04/15 1:52 AM, Anne van Kesteren wrote:
>
>  I'm defining X-Content-Type-Options which can be used to prevent
>> sniffing. I think it would make sense to support this header for
>> various font loading features that currently ignore MIME types.
>> However, that requires a list of font MIME types. Where should we keep
>> the definitive list? In the Font Loading specification?
>>
>
> David Kuettel catalogued the (mostly non-standard) MIME types being used
> for fonts, for the Webfonts working group, in preparation for making a new
> case for a top-level font MIME type:
>
> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kP3Edo3nDN_
> 2HS6IZK6DMnrvEG1StbY5OKmbwA1ilXI/edit


Thank you John and Anne!  Here is a link to the updated analysis for 2015:

*Web Font Media Type Analysis 2015*
http://goo.gl/zbDhUN

For reference, Vlad Levantovsky has proposed a new top-level media type for
fonts (along with a set of subtypes) in the editor's draft of the WOFF 2.0
specification:

*WOFF File Format 2.0 - Appendix A: Internet Media Type Registration*
http://dev.w3.org/webfonts/WOFF2/spec/#IMT

Perhaps this could become the definitive list.  Once approved (fingers
crossed), we would expect to see a rapid shift to the new, simple and
intuitive font media types.

At the moment, the ones in use for fonts are all over the board (as shown
in the analysis), which would likely complicate support for
"X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff"

>
>
>
> JH
>
>
> --
>
> Tiro Typeworks        www.tiro.com
> Gulf Islands, BC      tiro@tiro.com
>
> Propose to an Englishman any principle, or any instrument,
> however admirable, and you will observe that the whole effort
> of the English mind is directed to find a difficulty, a defect,
> or an impossibility in it. If you speak to him of a machine for
> peeling a potato, he will pronounce it impossible: if you peel
> a potato with it before his eyes, he will declare it useless,
> because it will not slice a pineapple.
>                     -- Charles Babbage
>
Received on Friday, 3 April 2015 18:26:23 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Monday, 2 May 2016 14:39:30 UTC