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Re: i18n-ISSUE-492: Honor the HTTP Accept-Language header for selecting the consent language

From: David Singer <singer@apple.com>
Date: Fri, 09 Oct 2015 07:54:42 -0700
Cc: public-tracking-comments@w3.org, international@w3.org, www-international@w3.org
Message-id: <401B19D5-D979-4471-B739-79EFDB8CD62B@apple.com>
To: Steven Atkin <atkin@us.ibm.com>

> On Oct 9, 2015, at 5:36 , Steven Atkin <atkin@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> 
> Hi David,
> 
> We certainly understand the desire to stay out of user interface issues. With that being said we do want to make sure that the spec does not do anything that prevents user agents from being able to obtain consents in other languages.

The spec requires the site to obtain consent, and there is no implied language (however, ‘informed consent’ presumably has strong implications).  Similarly the user-agent’s communications are nowhere restricted by the spec., as far as I know.

The only problematic strings I can see in the spec. are the explanationString and siteName, which we already note might be written to be misleading, and the operation of the TPE in no way depends on their content — they can safely be ignored, if needed.

So, having written the spec. to stay away from the user interface, and to express what is required, I’m still puzzled as to why you think any change is needed or what that change may be.

> Additionally, it may be worthwhile to point out that user agents may request consents in other languages and that implementers of this spec should be prepared to handle that. We can leave out how the discussion related to how they actually do this, e.g., HTTP Accept-Language setting.
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> 
> Steven Atkin, Ph.D.
> STSM - Chief Globalization Architect
> IBM Globalization Center of Competency
> atkin@us.ibm.com
> http://www-3.ibm.com/software/globalization/index.jsp
> 
> <graycol.gif>David Singer ---10/01/2015 04:22:31 PM---Hi Steven we tried very hard to stay out of user interface in the TPE specification. In section 4,
> 
> From: David Singer <singer@apple.com>
> To: Steven Atkin/Austin/IBM@IBMUS
> Cc: public-tracking-comments@w3.org, international@w3.org
> Date: 10/01/2015 04:22 PM
> Subject: Re: i18n-ISSUE-492: Honor the HTTP Accept-Language header for selecting the consent language
> Sent by: singer@apple.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Hi Steven
> 
> we tried very hard to stay out of user interface in the TPE specification.  In section 4, we merely say that you have to get the user’s informed consent to do things that are otherwise proscribed. The way you get that consent is out of scope, as is any UI.
> 
> 
> > On Oct 1, 2015, at 7:34 , Steven Atkin <atkin@us.ibm.com> wrote:
> > 
> > 4 Consent 
> > http://www.w3.org/TR/2015/WD-tracking-compliance-20150714/#user-granted-exceptions
> > 
> > When a consent is displayed to the end-user the consent should be displayed according to the HTTP Accept-Language setting. Additionally, a list of all available languages that the consent is available in should be displayed to the end-user in the event that the end-user wishes to see the consent in a different language.
> > 
> > 
> > Steven Atkin, Ph.D.
> > STSM - Chief Globalization Architect
> > IBM Globalization Center of Competency
> > atkin@us.ibm.com
> > http://www-3.ibm.com/software/globalization/index.jsp
> 
> David Singer
> Manager, Software Standards, Apple Inc.
> 
> 
> 
> 

David Singer
Manager, Software Standards, Apple Inc.
Received on Friday, 9 October 2015 14:55:12 UTC

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