W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-archive@w3.org > March 2004

RE: Named graphs etc

From: Pat Hayes <phayes@ihmc.us>
Date: Mon, 8 Mar 2004 22:58:26 -0600
Message-Id: <p06001f27bc72fd9e2bac@[10.0.100.76]>
To: "Jeremy Carroll" <jjc@hplb.hpl.hp.com>
Cc: <www-archive@w3.org>, "ext Jeremy Carroll" <jjc@hplb.hpl.hp.com>, <chris@bizer.de>

>Patrick:
>>  I still have some questions about how to "bootstrap" trust, such that
>>  it seems there must be some requirement for each graph to contain
>>  statements reflecting its source/authority (a signature perhaps?)
>>  otherwise, how do you anchor your trust in terms of a given graph?
>>
>
>It seems that there are three issues:
>
>- how can an author indicate that a graph is intended to be true (or is
>intended merely as an example)

Well, how about allowing graphs to say "this graph is not asserted". 
Smells of paradox, but it has the nice resolution that the graph is 
not asserted.  You can't assert it, in fact. If you try, it bites you.

>- how can a third party say that they trust such a graph

If the default is that if it can be asserted (see above) then it is 
asserted, then you can express trust by endorsing it.

What's the difference between trusting it and importing it? Getting 
this clear might be useful. I don't quite see the difference clearly.

>- how the end consumer determines which graphs to believe or not.

Why do we need to say anything about this? Seems unnecessary, and 
dangerous ground to tread on. Maybe the end user isn't doing any 
believing, just analyzing relationships between rival claims. Still 
needs to be able to distinguish a claim from a mere fiction.

>These seem less than orthogonal.
>
>e.g.
>
>_:g ( _:g rdf:type log:Unasserted .
>       ...
>       ... )
>
>seems like the author can make a strong statement of fictionality, but this
>borders on the paradoxical, when the ... is empty.

Well, no, its oK as long as we are monotonic.  You aren't saying its 
false, just that you aren't (here) asserting it. I can write a 
tautology and not assert it.

Pat
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Received on Monday, 8 March 2004 23:58:28 UTC

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