W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > January to March 2018

Re: Assistive Technology Detection

From: <accessys@smart.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2018 22:49:07 -0500 (EST)
To: Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>
cc: Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>, David Woolley <forums@david-woolley.me.uk>, "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.60.1801252247320.6527@cygnus.smart.net>

then remember that 70% of people with serious disabilities live below the 
poverty level which means many people are using older or outdated tech.

Bob



On Thu, 25 Jan 2018, Phill Jenkins wrote:

> Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2018 21:38:31 -0600
> From: Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>
> To: Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>
> Cc: David Woolley <forums@david-woolley.me.uk>,
>     "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> Subject: Re: Assistive Technology Detection
> Resent-Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2018 03:39:14 +0000
> Resent-From: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
> 
> | how can a site or app know
> | what web content technologies to serve up
> | that are accessibly supported
> | without knowing the user agents and AT the user is using?
>
> My understanding is that for a site or app to claim conformance, the
> claimant has to know or the claim has to state which accessibility
> supported technologies were relied upon in the conformance testing, not in
> what the user is using after the conformance testing is done.  Of course
> what users actually use significantly influences what are the definitive
> list of accessibility supported technologies.  There is no requirement to
> "serve up that technology" to claim conformance.
>
> For example, if the operating system and browser platform support high
> contrast technology, the claim can be made that the site or app conforms
> (or still conforms) with all the WCAG Success Criteria when the user is
> relying on those accessibility supported features in the operating system
> and browser platform.  The site or app conformance would fail if the 1.3.1
> Info and relationship success criteria fails because some labels or
> headings "disappeared" when turning on the high contrast accessibility
> features supported in the OS & Browser.
> ___________
> Regards,
> Phill Jenkins
> pjenkins@us.ibm.com
> Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive
> IBM Research Accessibility
> linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/
>
>
>
> From:   Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>
> To:     David Woolley <forums@david-woolley.me.uk>, "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org"
> <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> Date:   01/25/2018 06:52 PM
> Subject:        Re: Assistive Technology Detection
>
>
>
> Related to AT detection is how can a site or app know what web content
> technologies to serve up that are accessibly supported without knowing the
> user agents and AT the user is using?
>
> Accessibility supported is a requirement for conformance.   And research
> findings show differences in how browsers and ATs are supporting web
> content technologies.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thursday, January 25, 2018 7:08 PM, David Woolley
> <forums@david-woolley.me.uk> wrote:
>
>
> The dangers I see are:
>
> 1) this will reinforce the idea that the only disabled people are those
> that use JAWs.
>
> 2) it will probably have a similar effect to early mobile web sites,
> which tended to be cleaner, and easier to use that the main web site.
> That may mean that the main web site gets more difficult to use, and you
> won't be able to do the equivalent of using wap instead of www.
>
> On 25/01/18 19:18, accessys@smart.net wrote:
>>
>> counter to concept of accessibility, one should not need to identify
>> and personally I would be ,opposed to it.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Received on Friday, 26 January 2018 03:51:12 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Friday, 26 January 2018 03:51:13 UTC