W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > July to September 2017

Re: Unicode character for CC symbol?

From: Nigel Megitt <nigel.megitt@bbc.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 10:07:48 +0000
To: "Michael A. Peters" <mpeters@domblogger.net>, w3c WAI List <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <D5D4356A.47F9F%nigel.megitt@bbc.co.uk>
This seems on the face of it problematic. The trouble is that there is no
single representation for the idea of "closed captions" globally. Whereas
in the US it might be represented by something like "CC", in the UK where
closed captions are known more usually as subtitles, it is often
represented by "S". I may be wrong about this but I don't think Unicode
would normally create a code point for a glyph that has
territory/culture-specific variant forms.

Having said that, a globally usable label of some sort that means "this is
the button for switching closed captions on and off" could be useful.


On 03/09/2017, 22:33, "Michael A. Peters" <mpeters@domblogger.net> wrote:

>According to 
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_captioning_symbol.svg that
>symbol has been released into the public domain.
>
>It would make sense then for there to be a unicode character for it, in
>the technical range (where play and fast forward and pause glyphs exist)
>but I could not find one.
>
>For me where it would be useful is when designing html5 players, the
>standard audio players in most browsers don't show the CC button even
>when there are track elements provided and custom JS to display them.
>
>If it had a unicode character, I could modify my webfont to include it
>there and just specify the character glyph (in a span with title
>attribute of course) like I do with the other player control elements.
>
>I can suggest it to the unicode group but I wanted to make sure it
>doesn't already exist and I'm just not finding it, and also if it
>doesn't, hear any arguments as to why it might be a bad idea.
>
Received on Tuesday, 5 September 2017 10:08:23 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 5 September 2017 10:08:24 UTC