W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > April to June 2017

Re: Web accessibility for people with dyslexia

From: Elizabeth Pyatt <ejp10@psu.edu>
Date: Fri, 5 May 2017 08:16:59 -0400
Cc: WAI Interest Group <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-Id: <DA21C445-E42D-4EFB-8717-EA3E12F785E0@psu.edu>
To: "Michael A. Peters" <mpeters@domblogger.net>
FYI - Another font I like is Andika from SIL.org
http://software.sil.org/andika/

It’s designed for learners new to reading and is also optimized multiple languages (e.g. Spanish, French, Russian…). It’s under their open font license, and it does include a WOFF web font file. 

It has a lot of the same design characteristics recommended by the British Dyslexia Association (https://bdatech.org/what-technology/typefaces-for-dyslexia/)

Elizabeth


> On May 5, 2017, at 2:13 AM, Michael A. Peters <mpeters@domblogger.net> wrote:
> 
> On 05/03/2017 06:07 AM, Sandra Evans wrote:
>> Hi Brian
>> 
>> Can you provide some examples of the fonts you are referring to?
>> 
>> Thanks,
>> Sandra
> 
> When I looked at licensing fonts for dyslexia for use as webfonts it seemed that many of them either could not be licensed or were too expensive for me.
> 
> I did find a font that was not created specifically for dyslexia but to me anyway appeared to have many characteristics of fonts that were created for dyslexia.
> 
> It's called Cyntho Pro.
> 
> https://www.youworkforthem.com/font/T4888/cyntho-pro/
> 
> It is a very clean sans-serif font.
> 
> I am not dyslexic but I have found it is easier for me to read when that is the font used for the main content.
> 
> -=-
> Unfortunately my own personal disability involves memory issues from head injuries (epilepsy) and I don't recall the characteristics I looked for, but when I was looking for a dyslexia font and saw I either could not license the tested fonts for the web or saw that they were way too expensive to license, but I do remember there are certain letters where you need to check the characteristics of the shapes.
> 
> I think p and q and b and d were two of them but I don't remember what the characteristics to check for were, and there were some other letters where characteristic of the shape matters.
> 
> Also the font I linked has not been tested for the purpose and I can't afford to pay to have it tested for that purpose. So I hope it works but I can not say that it does.
> 
> Also also, it seems there are several different types of dyslexia and what works for some does not work for others.
> 
> A lot of dyslexic say Comic Sans MS is a free font that works well for them, but a friend of mine who is dyslexic says that font doesn't help her personally. And it also isn't as free as some seem to think. It isn't available (legally) as a system font on Linux and it can't (legally) be used as a webfont.
> 
> Interestingly she likes the old Apple font Monaco even though it is monospace.
> 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Elizabeth J. Pyatt, Ph.D.
Accessibility IT Consultant
Teaching and Learning with Technology
Penn State University
ejp10@psu.edu, (814) 865-0805 or (814) 865-2030 (Main Office)

The 300 Building
304 West College Avenue
University Park, PA 16801
http://accessibility.psu.edu
Received on Friday, 5 May 2017 12:17:31 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Friday, 5 May 2017 12:17:32 UTC