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Re: Accessible Documents - PDF vs. HTML

From: Andrew Cunningham <andj.cunningham@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 01:51:24 +1000
Message-ID: <CAOUP6KkZ_a0WaQ=6ubjLUXqz8S0E9SBo5sAaeXSQ2YqyUtHRLA@mail.gmail.com>
To: Duff Johnson <duff@duff-johnson.com>
Cc: w3c WAI List <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
It will be interesting to put it through its paces , esp with Hindi, Tamil
or Myanmar documents or stress test it with Mende Kikakui documents and see
if it will generate accessible PDF files.



Andrew Cunningham
andj.cunningham@gmail.com

On 18 June 2016 at 00:48, Duff Johnson <duff@duff-johnson.com> wrote:

> …and a related thought...
>
> Without implying any endorsement… there is an available plugin for Google
> Docs that is intended to produce accessible (indeed, PDF/UA-conforming) PDF
> documents from Google Docs.
>
> The product is in beta at this time.
>
> https://www.grackledocs.com/
>
> Duff.
>
>
> > On Jun 16, 2016, at 20:45, George Kerscher <kerscher@montana.com> wrote:
> >
> > Just a thought…GoogleDocs now supports export to EPUB 3, which is HTML
> packaged; it also has export to HTML. Perhaps a Word file with proper
> styles and checked for accessibility (after Office 2010) could transform
> that Word doc to something that would be cross platform and accessible?
> >
> > I am sure this is not the silver bullet, but worth exploring.
> >
> >
> > Best
> > George
> >
> >
> >
> > From: Andrew Cunningham [mailto:andj.cunningham@gmail.com]
> > Sent: Thursday, June 16, 2016 4:34 AM
> > To: J. Albert Bowden
> > Cc: Olaf Drümmer; w3c WAI List
> > Subject: Re: Accessible Documents - PDF vs. HTML
> >
> > Yes ... for developers, and web support staff. But content owners and
> content authors will not be using text editors ... they will either be
> using ms
> >
> > So ... maybe the question is what building blocks exist to create an
> editing environment yhat will generate accessible content assuming the
> templates and themese used by a web application meet accessibility
> requirements?
> >
> > A.
> >
> > On Thursday, 16 June 2016, J. Albert Bowden <jalbertbowden@gmail.com>
> wrote:
> > > tools for working with HTML: any editor....literally any editor. you
> can use notepad in windows even! and i mean notepad, not notepad++, simply
> save the .txt document as .html instead.
> > >
> > > jedit has been my go to for nearly a decade now, sublime text is
> probably one of the most popular on the market, atom is editor created by
> github, brackets was created by adobe....just to name a few.
> > >
> > > tools for creating accessible HTML documents: w3c validators,
> tenion.io, accessibility project's resouces:
> http://a11yproject.com/resources.html and w3c's web accessibility
> evaluation tools https://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/, to name a few.
> > >
> > > pro tip: using HTML properly will get you closer to accessible than
> anything else...not to take away from some of these tools, but properly
> using HTML reinforces accessibility, because HTML has some accessibility
> already baked in.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 3:33 PM, Olaf Drümmer <
> olaflist@callassoftware.com> wrote:
> > >>
> > >> It seems there is some agreement that HTML is  a good option, but
> Word is not the right tool to create HTML.
> > >>
> > >> Can anybody share which tools they use to make their accessible HTML
> files?
> > >>
> > >> Olaf
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > J. Albert Bowden II
> > >
> > > jalbertbowden@gmail.com
> > >
> > > http://bowdenweb.com/
> > >
> > >
> >
> > --
> > Andrew Cunningham
> > andj.cunningham@gmail.com
> >
>
>
>
Received on Friday, 17 June 2016 15:51:52 UTC

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