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Re: Colour Luminosity/Contrast for form inputs/controls/components

From: Wayne Dick <wayneedick@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2016 22:16:15 -0800
Message-ID: <CAJeQ8SBG13YB2jp55EhktgiMYOeN4yuiU1K4rvr=RyCaGzSrbw@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Chakravarthula, Srinivasu" <srchakravarthula@informatica.com>
Cc: Jonathan Avila <jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com>, WCAG <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Style observation I don't know what mode I'm in but my text seems to
be going out in couplets.

Oh well call me Shakespeare.


Wayne


On Tue, Nov 8, 2016 at 10:13 PM, Wayne Dick <wayneedick@gmail.com> wrote:
> Finding focus and seeing radio buttons and check boxes is a perennial
> problem for reading websites with low vision.  Radio buttons and check
> boxes are the worst because they are impervious to CSS.
>
> The standard focus ring given by user agent is usually a dotted line.
> Maybe each dot has sufficient, but run together with the white between
> the dots the overall effect is almost impossible to detect.
>
> There is one thing that everyone with low vision shares. We cannot
> find stuff. The mechanism is different for each medical condition, but
> the overall result is we can't find stuff.
>
> Whatever we decide, key is that it has to be dramatic enough to to
> catch our attention. It has to rise above the noise of the page.
>
> I think this is where the ability to customize is very important. What
> is noise to me is not noise to Jon. What catches Jon's or Vasu's eye
> may not catch mine. But the thing we agree on is we cannot find
> critical information.
>
> Thanks for bringing it up.
>
> Wayne
>
> On Tue, Nov 8, 2016 at 8:59 PM, Chakravarthula, Srinivasu
> <srchakravarthula@informatica.com> wrote:
>> Jon,
>>
>> You have made a good point about background color vs a ring. I personally
>> like background colors too; but there are a couple of challenges with it:
>>
>> 1.      It causes disturbing to some section of low vision people where
>> color gets changed suddenly (I see some developers make it as animation sort
>> of and that causes a problem); so there needs to be a smooth transition.
>>
>> 2.      We may get objection from visual designers about background colors
>> (while it should not be really a problem to them); but their argument could
>> be something like “oh, I don’t like to have a background color for an
>> element in between the content”…
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>>
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> -Vasu
>>
>> --
>>
>> Srinivasu Chakravarthula
>>
>> Lead Accessibility Consultant
>>
>> Informatica Business Solutions Pvt Ltd.,
>>
>> Work: +91-80-4020-3760 | Cell: +91 99008 10881
>>
>> Website | Accessibility Blog | LinkedIn | Twitter
>>
>>
>>
>> From: Jonathan Avila [mailto:jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com]
>> Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2016 1:19 AM
>> To: WCAG <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
>> Subject: RE: Colour Luminosity/Contrast for form inputs/controls/components
>>
>>
>>
>> Ø  I agree, often we use changes in background colours which are far more
>> obvious.
>>
>>
>>
>> I agree my suggestion is only a technique and is not the only way to solve
>> the issue.
>>
>>
>>
>> However, I’d like to challenge this notion that background colors are better
>> than a focus ring.  The challenge with borders and backgrounds is that many
>> elements have them already and the user is left guessing which background
>> color is normal and which one indicates the focused state.  I’ve seen thick
>> borders used on non-focused buttons as well – they look like focused buttons
>> – but they aren’t.  You don’t know where the keyboard focus is under you
>> start moving it around to try and figure out what is changing.    If the
>> background only changes to indicate the focus element even if it has
>> sufficient contrast with the text what if that background doesn’t have
>> sufficient contrast between the normal background color of other controls.
>> Then you are relying on insufficient contrast between focused and
>> non-focused elements to indicate which one is focused.  Relying simply on
>> contrast other than something more pronounced is an issue.
>>
>>
>>
>> Jonathan
>>
>>
>>
>> Jonathan Avila
>>
>> Chief Accessibility Officer
>>
>> SSB BART Group
>>
>> jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com
>>
>> 703.637.8957 (Office)
>>
>>
>>
>> Visit us online: Website | Twitter | Facebook | Linkedin | Blog
>>
>> Join SSB at Accessing Higher Ground This Month!
>>
>>
>>
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>>
>>
>>
>> From: Alastair Campbell [mailto:acampbell@nomensa.com]
>> Sent: Monday, November 07, 2016 11:32 AM
>> To: WCAG
>> Subject: Re: Colour Luminosity/Contrast for form inputs/controls/components
>>
>>
>>
>>> As a Technique, this may very well address the problem statement, however
>>> we must be careful not to be overly prescriptive of our expectations - we
>>> cannot for example 'mandate' this as a Success Criteria going forward.
>>
>>
>>
>> I agree, often we use changes in background colours which are far more
>> obvious.
>>
>>
>>
>> It might be a good SC for a future set of guidelines that include
>> user-agents though ;-)
>>
>>
>>
>> -Alastair
>>
>>
>>
>>
Received on Wednesday, 9 November 2016 06:17:28 UTC

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