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Re: Colour Luminosity/Contrast for form inputs/controls/components

From: Wayne Dick <wayneedick@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2016 22:13:41 -0800
Message-ID: <CAJeQ8SAS+rjFFqT=DHeSB84E+eyh81vdN=dq7V5qBN16nnQPWA@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Chakravarthula, Srinivasu" <srchakravarthula@informatica.com>
Cc: Jonathan Avila <jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com>, WCAG <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Finding focus and seeing radio buttons and check boxes is a perennial
problem for reading websites with low vision.  Radio buttons and check
boxes are the worst because they are impervious to CSS.

The standard focus ring given by user agent is usually a dotted line.
Maybe each dot has sufficient, but run together with the white between
the dots the overall effect is almost impossible to detect.

There is one thing that everyone with low vision shares. We cannot
find stuff. The mechanism is different for each medical condition, but
the overall result is we can't find stuff.

Whatever we decide, key is that it has to be dramatic enough to to
catch our attention. It has to rise above the noise of the page.

I think this is where the ability to customize is very important. What
is noise to me is not noise to Jon. What catches Jon's or Vasu's eye
may not catch mine. But the thing we agree on is we cannot find
critical information.

Thanks for bringing it up.

Wayne

On Tue, Nov 8, 2016 at 8:59 PM, Chakravarthula, Srinivasu
<srchakravarthula@informatica.com> wrote:
> Jon,
>
> You have made a good point about background color vs a ring. I personally
> like background colors too; but there are a couple of challenges with it:
>
> 1.      It causes disturbing to some section of low vision people where
> color gets changed suddenly (I see some developers make it as animation sort
> of and that causes a problem); so there needs to be a smooth transition.
>
> 2.      We may get objection from visual designers about background colors
> (while it should not be really a problem to them); but their argument could
> be something like “oh, I don’t like to have a background color for an
> element in between the content”…
>
>
>
> Thanks
>
>
>
> Best regards,
>
> -Vasu
>
> --
>
> Srinivasu Chakravarthula
>
> Lead Accessibility Consultant
>
> Informatica Business Solutions Pvt Ltd.,
>
> Work: +91-80-4020-3760 | Cell: +91 99008 10881
>
> Website | Accessibility Blog | LinkedIn | Twitter
>
>
>
> From: Jonathan Avila [mailto:jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2016 1:19 AM
> To: WCAG <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
> Subject: RE: Colour Luminosity/Contrast for form inputs/controls/components
>
>
>
> Ø  I agree, often we use changes in background colours which are far more
> obvious.
>
>
>
> I agree my suggestion is only a technique and is not the only way to solve
> the issue.
>
>
>
> However, I’d like to challenge this notion that background colors are better
> than a focus ring.  The challenge with borders and backgrounds is that many
> elements have them already and the user is left guessing which background
> color is normal and which one indicates the focused state.  I’ve seen thick
> borders used on non-focused buttons as well – they look like focused buttons
> – but they aren’t.  You don’t know where the keyboard focus is under you
> start moving it around to try and figure out what is changing.    If the
> background only changes to indicate the focus element even if it has
> sufficient contrast with the text what if that background doesn’t have
> sufficient contrast between the normal background color of other controls.
> Then you are relying on insufficient contrast between focused and
> non-focused elements to indicate which one is focused.  Relying simply on
> contrast other than something more pronounced is an issue.
>
>
>
> Jonathan
>
>
>
> Jonathan Avila
>
> Chief Accessibility Officer
>
> SSB BART Group
>
> jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com
>
> 703.637.8957 (Office)
>
>
>
> Visit us online: Website | Twitter | Facebook | Linkedin | Blog
>
> Join SSB at Accessing Higher Ground This Month!
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>
> From: Alastair Campbell [mailto:acampbell@nomensa.com]
> Sent: Monday, November 07, 2016 11:32 AM
> To: WCAG
> Subject: Re: Colour Luminosity/Contrast for form inputs/controls/components
>
>
>
>> As a Technique, this may very well address the problem statement, however
>> we must be careful not to be overly prescriptive of our expectations - we
>> cannot for example 'mandate' this as a Success Criteria going forward.
>
>
>
> I agree, often we use changes in background colours which are far more
> obvious.
>
>
>
> It might be a good SC for a future set of guidelines that include
> user-agents though ;-)
>
>
>
> -Alastair
>
>
>
>
Received on Wednesday, 9 November 2016 06:14:54 UTC

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