Background references for URC issues

weibel@oclc.org
Mon, 12 Dec 1994 09:59:43 -0500


From: weibel@oclc.org
Date: Mon, 12 Dec 1994 09:59:43 -0500
Message-Id: <199412121459.JAA08643@ws02-00.rsch.oclc.org>
To: uri@bunyip.com
Subject: Background references for URC  issues

Folks,

  The following are references I cited as background information in my remarks
at the URI meeting in San Jose last week.  In addition, I added one that Erik
Jul brought to my attention that may be of interest.

  If you are interested but cannot get these from your local library, let me 
know and I'll see what I can do.

I'll also be happy to post my notes from my talk if anyone would like to see them.

stu

---------------------------


The following articles afford an introduction to TEI headers and their 
application, as well as some background on the evolution of cataloging 
standards in libraries. 
 
The Documentation of Electronic Texts Using Text Encoding Initiative  
Headers: An Introduction 
Richard Giordano 
Library Resources and Technical Services 
38(4) 389-401 1994 
 
   Discusses the benefits and possible faults of the TEI header as a 
   basis for electronic text cataloging.  A basic introduction to TEI 
   headers 
 
Cataloging Electronic Texts: The University of Virginia Library  
Experience 
Edward Gaynor 
Library Resources and Technical Services 
38(4) 403-413 
 
   Describes one of the first efforts to integrate electronic document 
   cataloging in a conventional library environment; discusses aspects 
   of mapping between TEI headers and MARC records. 
 
The Core Record: A New Bibliographic Standard 
Willy Cromwell 
Library Resources and Technical Services 
38(4) 415-424 1994 
 
   A background paper on the development of a new cataloging level 
   intended to reduce the costs of cataloging; less extensive than 
   conventional full-level cataloging, more detailed than minimal-level 
   cataloging. 


Taylor, Arlene G.  1994.  The information universe: Will we have chaos or
control?  American Libraries 25, no. 7: 629-632.

   A good overview of what librarianship has traditionally brought to the
   management of information, including issues of description and access,
   and how these same capabilities are necessary for information in
   electronic format accessible via wide-area computer networks.