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Re: longevity of names

From: Danny Ayers <danny.ayers@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2010 18:52:42 +0100
Message-ID: <1f2ed5cd1003251052w7d007894j31fb4cc3d70ba65@mail.gmail.com>
To: Frank Manola <fmanola@acm.org>
Cc: Semantic Web <semantic-web@w3.org>
On 25 March 2010 17:36, Frank Manola <fmanola@acm.org> wrote:
> Danny--
>
> After reading your OP and several responses, I'm still not sure exactly what this thread is about.  Is the problem
>
> - "who [or what] is this "Julius Caesar" that these ancient texts talk about?"
>
> - "I can't read these ancient texts [in which names including "Julius Caesar" might appear, only I can't tell because I can't read them]?"
>
> - both?

The second one we appear to be able to deal with, the cloud as someone
(Peter?) said before. Broad data redundancy (as far as I can see)
seems a done deal. But the indexes for it, the names for things, dare
I say it - the metadata - seems very delicate.

> --Frank "feeling he needs an example"

I have a bunch of pages online about my homemade guitar. Maybe 1k of
text, 1MB of images. Because I put a lot of effort in, I believe this
to important information. But I can't for the life of me remember what
I called the pages, and I'm sure there are a couple of clones already.
So how do I tell you (and your agents) how to find these things?

Or to put it another, let's say bronze age man asked for two pints of
semi-skimmed to be delivered. Easy note for the milkman, just make a
circle of stones.

Beh, that's a bit distractory - but all the hippies turn up at
stonehenge for the summer solstice, but from what I gather the
alignments are better for the shortest day.

I guess it's discoverability (& to a lesser extent provenance).

Can I see your first web page please Frank?

Cheers,
Danny.


-- 
http://danny.ayers.name
Received on Thursday, 25 March 2010 17:53:15 UTC

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