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Re: Should I Stay or Should I Go: Statistics on people leaving Facebook?

From: Christine Perey <cperey@perey.com>
Date: Fri, 04 Sep 2009 09:37:53 +0200
Message-ID: <4AA0C3D1.1030007@perey.com>
To: Karl Dubost <karl@la-grange.net>
CC: Harry Halpin <hhalpin@ibiblio.org>, public-xg-socialweb@w3.org
Hi,

So far, as Harry asks in the original title of this thread (Statistics?) 
nothing I have read or heard on this topic has been quantitative.

Once again METRICS are missing.

 From what I am hearing on the mobile social networking side, 
communities report that membership growth is continuing as is engagement 
(though measurements of engagement remain elusive).

Could it be that people are unwilling to use social network services 
ONLY while parked (sedentary) in front of their PCs and that the mode of 
access is migrating?

Those who are unwilling to migrate to mobile access mode are dropping 
entirely. And they have more time to speak with the Wall Street Journal 
or New York Times writers.

Also, I think that the content and user experience of a general purpose 
(what I call "flat") community service (e.g., Facebook) makes it more 
challenging to hold the member's attention in comparison with the more 
focused community services (focusing on meeting a specific human need, 
e.g., dating, games, finding a good place to eat or hang out, find a job 
in your neighborhood).

Mobile-centric communities have, in general, tended to begin more 
focused on one or a small number of specific human needs, certainly more 
focused than Facebook.

-- 
Christine
cperey@perey.com
mobile +41 79 436 68 69
VoIP (from US) +1 (617) 848-8159
Skype (from anywhere) Christine_Perey


Karl Dubost wrote:
>
> Le 3 sept. 2009 à 14:13, Harry Halpin a écrit :
>>  reasons for leaving in general?
>> [1] http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/30/magazine/30FOB-medium-t.html
>
>
>
> 1. One's own social network has moved to another site. You are a 
> follower or a pioneer
>    Remember Orkut migrations, friendster, twitter, etc.
> 2. The new policy of the social network doesn't make people happy (ex: 
> Facebook policies change in the past)
> 3. A small social network is being bought by a bigCo and people don't 
> want to be part of it anymore (ex: Flickr bought by Yahoo!)
> 4. Some people realize that they spent far too much time on it and the 
> only way to be reasonable is to quit completely.
>
> And certainly other reasons.
>
Received on Friday, 4 September 2009 07:38:35 UTC

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